KUER 90.1 | NPR Utah

Latest News

Howard Berkes / NPR

SL Trib’s Brian Maffly: BLM’s Management Proposals Could Mean Mining, Drilling In Grand Staircase

The Bureau of Land Management has issued draft proposals outlining the uses the federal government wants to allow in the Grand Staircase-Escalante and Bears Ears national monuments in southern Utah.

Read More

A rundown of the races, candidates and more for Utah’s 2018 midterm elections.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is reporting a record 72,000 people died from opioid overdoses last year. Meanwhile, a newly published study from the University of Colorado shows pet owners may be intentionally hurting their animals to get the drug for themselves.   

marijuana leaf.
iStock.com / Darren415

Updated 8/16/18 4:22 pm

An anti-marijuana group said it is not party to a lawsuit filed this week to stop a medical marijuana ballot initiative. A spokesperson for Drug Safe Utah said they didn't agree to be named plaintiffs in the suit.

With its breathtaking views, the Mountain West has long been a destination for weddings. But now, some wedding industry workers are seeing fewer couples wanting to get hitched in late summer months because of an increasingly smoky backdrop.

UNIFIED FIRE AUTHORITY

The Draper City Fire Battalion Chief who was killed this week battling California wildfires will receive a full honor guard escort from Ukiah, California to Salt Lake City on Wednesday.

Singer headshot.
Kelsie Moore / KUER

 

The third in a series on the Democratic candidates challenging Utah's Republican incumbents in this year's congressional midterm races.

James Courage Singer may be the first Native American to run for Congress in Utah, and the 35-year-old progressive Democrat thinks his candidacy could inspire others in this underrepresented community.

A woman on the sidewalk is helped by an officer and paramedic.
Whittney Evans / KUER

Tuesday morning, Utah Highway Patrol Trooper Jeremy McKenzie is making his rounds through the Rio Grande neighborhood. He surveys the streets for criminal activity and people who need help. Last year it was a lot easier to spot someone smoking spice or injecting heroin on the sidewalk. It's still a rough neighborhood, he says, but it's much safer now.

You may not have noticed, but a few months ago the Trump Administration stopped using a century-old law to fine industries when birds are accidentally killed by oil spills, power lines or wind farms.

The second in a series on the Democratic candidates challenging Utah's Republican incumbents in this year's congressional midterm races.


On a hot July evening, Shireen Ghorbani walked a neighborhood on Salt Lake's west side as she campaigned to represent Utah's 2nd Congressional District. Not many people answered their doors, but eventually, someone did: Brandon Jensen, who works in finance.

Headshot of Matt Burchett in Uniform.
Unified Fire Authority

Utah officials are praising a Draper firefighter who was killed while battling California's biggest wildfire, the first fatality of the massive Mendocino Complex Fire. 

If there's a fee for either a camping site or a day use area on Forest Service land, there's probably some kind of toilet there. But solving the problem of human waste in vaulted or backcountry toilets is not as easy as flushing it out of the system.

Pages

RadioWest

What Doesn't Kill Us...

Is it true that what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger? We've surrounded ourselves with devices and technologies meant to make life safer and easier, but are they also making us weaker?

The Realities of Diversity

Join us for the first of our 3-part speaker series featuring Jelani Cobb of The New Yorker — happening August 29.

_

This Week's News In Your Inbox

Get the latest in news, events and station happenings every Thursday with KUER's newsletter.

NPR News

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is reporting a record 72,000 people died from opioid overdoses last year. Meanwhile, a newly published study from the University of Colorado shows pet owners may be intentionally hurting their animals to get the drug for themselves.   

Even in a strong economy, many Americans live paycheck to paycheck. Forty percent don't have $400 to cover an emergency expense, such as a car repair. And many working-class people turn to payday loans or other costly ways to borrow money. But more companies are stepping in to help their workers with a much cheaper way to get some emergency cash.

Startup companies that offer better options for workers are partnering with all kinds of businesses — from giants like Walmart to little fried chicken restaurants.

Dr. Jodi Jackson has worked for years to address infant mortality in Kansas. Often, that means she is treating newborns in a high-tech neonatal intensive care unit with sophisticated equipment whirring and beeping. That is exactly the wrong place for an infant like Lili.

Lili's mother, Victoria, used heroin for the first two-thirds of her pregnancy and hated herself for it. (NPR is using her first name only, because she has used illegal drugs.)

Senate Democrats threatened to sue the National Archives to obtain documents from Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's career as a White House official during President George W. Bush's administration.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., told reporters Thursday that Democrats will file a lawsuit if the National Archives does not respond to their Freedom of Information Act request. The suit is a last-ditch effort to obtain the documents ahead of confirmation hearings set begin Sept. 4.

After two days of silence and a barrage of criticism for failing to address the latest clergy sex abuse scandal in the United States, Pope Francis has spoken.

"The Holy See condemns unequivocally the sexual abuse of minors," said a statement issued by the Vatican on Thursday.

"Regarding the report made public in Pennsylvania this week, there are two words that can express the feelings faced with these horrible crimes: shame and sorrow," Vatican spokesman Greg Burke wrote.

More News