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Erik Neumann / KUER

Out Of Network? Out Of Luck: 'Balance Billing' Takes Patients By Surprise In Utah

For climbers like Salt Lake resident Mike Lyons, the act of tying a safety knot in a climbing rope is a ritual. Ensuring a correctly tied knot is a connection between climbing partners, a way to focus and, most importantly, to avoid injury in case of a fall. It comes down to routine.

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Photo of patch.
Rocio Hernandez / KUER

The South Salt Lake Police Department has added a new patch to its officers’ uniforms as they continue to mourn Officer David Romrell, who was killed by a burglary suspect two months ago.

Photo of organizaiton's booths.
Courtesy Utah Nonprofits Association

As the partial government shutdown stretches into its fourth week, Utah nonprofits are feeling the pressure, according to a survey by the Utah Nonprofits Association (UNA) which found that 10 percent of its members have seen in increase in the demand for services from furloughed workers.

Yellowstone officials try to make it very clear that tourists should not get close to wild bison. There are posters, educational videos and park rangers who warn people to stay clear of wildlife. But all that education might not be cutting it, according to a recent study. 

Photo of Nate Salazar
Courtesy Nate Salazar

Nate Salazar was sworn in as the newest board member of the Salt Lake City School District on January 8. Salazar attended Bryant Middle School and graduated from East High School in 2004. He’s currently the only minority on the board for a district where more than half of the students are minorities. He also works in Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski’s office as the associate director of community empowerment. KUER’s Rocio Hernandez spoke with Salazar about what he hopes to accomplish and why he wanted to be on the board.

Suicide is currently the second leading cause of death for adolescents in the country. And in the Mountain West, youth suicide rates are double, and in some cases triple, the national average. Now, a new study shows parents are often unaware that their kids are struggling.

Photo of DOJ.
iStock.com / pabradyphoto

As the partial government shutdown drags toward its fifth week, immigration courts are another aspect of government caught in the middle of the standstill in Congress.

Photo of Legacy Parkway sign.
Nicole Nixon / KUER

Besides the mosquitos, Angie Keeton loves everything about living near Legacy Parkway. There’s open green space, birds and other wildlife, and bike paths with plenty of neighborhood playgrounds for her 7-year-old son to play on.

Photo of federal building.
Nicole Nixon / KUER

As the record-breaking government shutdown continues into its fourth week, state budget managers are preparing for portions of the federal government to remain closed for weeks or even months more. That could leave the state to pick up the tab for programs like nutritional assistance and unemployment claims from furloughed federal workers.

Photo of Murray Police car.
Wikimedia Commons.

Police have arrested two men suspected of involvement in Sunday’s shooting outside Fashion Place Mall in Murray, as some local lawmakers who were at the scene questioned the mall’s safety procedures.

Illustration of depression.
Renee Bright / KUER

Ahead of the upcoming legislative session, a Utah LGBTQ group is preparing a bill that would ban conversion therapy, a form of psychotherapy that purports to help people with same-sex attraction to become heterosexual.

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RadioWest

Coal's Deadly Dust

Howard Berkes joins us to talk about his reporting of an epidemic of black lung disease that is suffocating and killing the country's coal miners.

Slippery Slope

The ski industry is going through changes, and the Mountain West News Bureau is reporting on them in our new series, airing this week.

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Maybe you’ve heard we’re a divided country. Here at KUER, we’re going to challenge that idea with a new podcast about finding connection in a time of division.

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NPR News

Britain's prime minister, Theresa May, faced hours of blistering criticism on Monday from more than 100 lawmakers who questioned her leadership a week after Parliament decisively rejected her plan for leaving the European Union and mounted a failed effort to unseat her through a vote of no confidence.

May struggled to bring new ideas to parliament with just two months to go until the March 29 deadline for the United Kingdom to leave the European Union.

"Good will is slipping away, as well as time," said Rupa Huq, a member of parliament from the Labour Party.

Stephanie Clayton won her fourth term in the Kansas legislature as a moderate Republican but when she started in office this month, she did so as a Democrat. She says she had an abrupt change of heart about a month after the November election last year.

It was the day Republican legislative leaders said they wanted to rewrite a school-finance bill that Clayton and other moderate Republicans had worked alongside Democrats to pass in last year's session. For her, it was a breaking point.

A leading Nicaraguan journalist has left the country following a police raid on his newsroom last month.

Carlos Fernando Chamorro, editor of the online publication Confidencial, announced on Sunday that he has gone into exile in Costa Rica, citing suppression of independent press under Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega.

A viral video of a Native American man surrounded by teenagers at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., created a furor and spurred an apology from the students' Kentucky high school. But since then, other videos and narratives have emerged that give more context to Friday's confrontation.

It happened on the same steps where civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. called for racial harmony in the U.S. with his famous "I Have a Dream" speech in 1963.

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