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Daysha Eaton / KUER

Provo-Based LGBTQ Youth Resource Center Encircle Heads To Salt Lake

The Provo-based Encircle, a resource and counseling center for LGBTQ youths and their families, opened a new branch on Thursday in Salt Lake City. Part of the reason they’re expanding is demand — in 2018, they served around 1,000 young people per month and provided counselling to an average of 400 of those they served. And many of their clients had to travel long distances to access services.

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Welcome back to another session of the Utah Legislature … and another season of 45 Days!

Photo of missionaries on bikes.
iStock.com / MattGush

In a significant shift, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is now allowing its 65,000 missionaries worldwide to communicate with their families once a week through text messages, online messaging, phone calls and video chats in addition to letters and emails, officials announced Friday on Twitter.

Photo of Georgia Apartments.
Rocio Hernandez / KUER

Salt Lake City prosecutors have filed 15 misdemeanor charges against Carol Lunt, the owner and landlord of the Georgia Apartments building, which was deemed unsafe for habitation by the city’s fire marshal this week.

Photo of Daniel Thatcher.
Cory Dinter for KUER

A proposal to strengthen Utah’s hate crimes statute is struggling to garner support from Republican lawmakers, despite signals from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints that it would not oppose the legislation this year.

On an unseasonably warm February day, Travis Kauffman headed out around noon for a run in the foothills outside Fort Collins, wearing shorts and a fleece pullover.

Within two hours, he'd emerge from the woods — clothes tattered, body blood-smeared, but alive.

The story of how he came face-to-face with a juvenile mountain lion and not only survived, but killed the animal that attacked him, soon became the stuff of legend. It's the type of story that feeds the impulses of internet commenters and quickly embeds itself in local folklore, like a Wild West tall tale come to life.

Photo of bees at capitol.
Renee Bright / KUER

A year after a high school shooting in Parkland, Fla., Utah lawmakers from both parties are pushing a slate of school safety and gun reform measures this session. But the Republican supermajority hasn’t been too eager to debate many of these proposals, including a controversial “red flag” law. This week, we discuss the status of gun bills this year and talk to a local March for Our Lives activist about what’s changed — and what hasn’t — since the Parkland massacre. To inject some levity, we also investigate the not-so-secret circus past of one Republican lawmaker.

Photo of Ryan Zinke.
Gage Skidmore / Flickr Creative Commons

Former U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke might be the first member of President Trump’s cabinet to join a lobbying firm after leaving office.

Photo of radioactive waste barrell.
iStock.com / WellPhoto

A state Senate committee advanced legislation Thursday that would eliminate a policy obstacle that prevents EnergySolutions from accepting large volumes of depleted uranium at its Tooele County radioactive waste landfill.

Austen Diamond / KUER

Two competing proposals dealing with the process of changing a person’s sex on legal documents were abandoned by Utah lawmakers on Thursday.

Photo of Noah Blumenthal.
Julia Ritchey / KUER

 

In the year since a gunman opened fire at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., killing 17 people, there have been marches, town halls and a resurgence of student activism. But, as far as 17-year-old Noah Blumenthal can see, not a lot of substantive policy change.

Lawmakers Ponder Makeover For Utah State Flag

Feb 13, 2019
Courtesy of Organization for a New Utah Flag

Try to picture the Utah state flag without looking at the bottom of this page. It’s navy blue and it has an eagle and that’s probably as far as you got, right?

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RadioWest

The Last Cowboys

Friday, we're talking about the Wright family of ranchers and rodeo cowboys in central Utah. They're working to keep a foot in the West’s past while trying to navigate its new realities.

Podcast: 45 Days

Photo of bees at capitol.
Renee Bright / KUER

A year after a high school shooting in Parkland, Fla., Utah lawmakers from both parties are pushing a slate of school safety and gun reform measures this session. But the Republican supermajority hasn’t been too eager to debate many of these proposals, including a controversial “red flag” law. This week, we discuss the status of gun bills this year and talk to a local March for Our Lives activist about what’s changed — and what hasn’t — since the Parkland massacre. To inject some levity, we also investigate the not-so-secret circus past of one Republican lawmaker.

Click here for more from "45 Days"

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Inside the concert hall of the Violin Museum in Cremona, Italy, Antonio de Lorenzi plays the prelude from Bach's Partita No. 3 on a Stradivarius violin. Cremona is the town where master luthier Antonio Stradivari crafted his storied instruments three centuries ago.

But there's no guarantee that his instruments' inimitable sound will survive for centuries more, says Fausto Cacciatori, the museum's chief conservator.

On a cold, bright Sunday afternoon during New York Fashion Week, nearly six hundred people packed into an old building in Manhattan's Lower East Side for an unusual lingerie show.

When Ryan Zinke, a former Navy SEAL, left his post as U.S. Interior Department secretary on Jan. 2, he was under fire on multiple fronts.

Tom and Tamara Conry were dead set on returning to Paradise after the deadly Camp Fire destroyed the town last November. The couple's home was barely touched by the fire, and most other survivors had a much steeper climb to recovery.

But when their property insurer, American Reliable, notified them in December that it wasn't renewing the couple's homeowner's coverage, they realized that returning home would be even harder than expected.

Just a few blocks past a college bookstore, modern restaurants with beer flights and big-screen TVs, and gift shops selling the same trinkets you'd find in any tourist town in America, you might wander onto a cobblestone street.

A rooster crows. The smell and sound of horses drifts in the breeze. Women go about their business dressed in caps and petticoats; men wear breeches, perhaps a cravat.

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