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government shutdown

Winter is when the federal government starts spending dollars to prepare for the wildfire season, but the ongoing shutdown has put some of this preparation in limbo.

Photo of Joshua Tree entrance sign.
National Parks Service

As the partial government shutdown stretches toward a third week, both the public and public employees alike are feeling the pain. But there’s another casualty: public information.

Photo of U.S. Capitol.
Nicole Nixon / KUER

For 30 years, Steve Bryant has worked as a cartography contractor — a map maker — for the National Forest Service.

Photo of food bank.
Brian Albers / KUER

A backed-up line of grocery carts pushed by furloughed federal employees wound between aisles at the Catholic Community Services food pantry in Ogden, forcing Cheryl Meyers some tough choices.

Screenshot of President Trump's Address.
Screenshot AP

Reactions to President Trump’s Oval Office speech on Tuesday night fell predictably along party lines, though more Utah Republicans are openly embracing the president’s hardline stance of keeping the government shuttered as the impasse over wall funding persists.

Photo of craft beers.
iStock.com / EddieHernandezPhotography

If the impasse over President Trump’s proposed border wall makes it to Saturday morning, this will be the longest government shutdown in U.S. history. And it has an unlikely victim — craft beer.

Pres. Donald Trump Illustration from NPR.
NPR

President Trump is addressing the nation about border security tonight (Tuesday, Jan. 8). Democratic leaders Nancy Pelosi and Charles Schumer will give a joint response immediately following. The government is partially shut down, with Trump in a stalemate with Democrats over funding for a wall along the southern border. Watch his remarks live.

Photo of closed road at Arches National Park.
Judy Fahys/KUER News

The U.S. Interior Department announced Sunday it will take the extraordinary step of using entrance fees for daily operations during the partial government shutdown.

Photo of old faithful.
Nate Hegyi / KUER

Unlike previous administrations, President Trump’s Interior Department has directed national parks to keep their gates open while furloughing most workers during this latest government shutdown. But as the partial shutdown enters its third week, critics argue the parks are becoming unsafe.

Photo of John Curtis.
Nicole Nixon / KUER

As the partial government shutdown enters its third week, roughly 800,000 federal workers are still without pay. Rep. John Curtis, R-Utah, said members of Congress should forfeit pay during government shutdowns, too.

Photo of Capitol Reef closed.
StephenTrimble.com

As the partial government shutdown appeared likely to enter its third week, Utah’s tourism office assembled plans to fund another week of skeleton services at the state’s two busiest national parks.

Photo of McAdams.
Nicole Nixon / KUER

Ben McAdams became the only Democrat in Utah’s congressional delegation on Thursday, when he was sworn into office as Representative of the 4th Congressional District.

Photo of Romney.
Nicole Nixon / KUER

Amid a government shutdown and criticism from fellow Republicans for his op-ed expressing disappointment in President Trump, Mitt Romney took the oath of office and became Utah’s newest Senator on Thursday.

In a short interview with KUER before being sworn in, Romney discussed his priorities as Utah’s freshman senator, his thoughts about the partial shutdown and reaction from President Trump to his opinion piece.

Photo of visitors at Zion National Park.
iStock.com / kellyvandellen

Visitors have not stopped entering national parks despite the partial government shutdown that started Dec. 22 and Zion National Park in southern Utah is no exception.

Joel Palmer, FEMA employee
Julia Ritchey / KUER

Utah is keeping its national parks open during the government shutdown, but hundreds of other federal workers employed in the state are facing a more uncertain future.

iStock.com

Utah tourism officials were braced  for a partial government shutdown that threatened to close the gates at the five national parks in the state – Arches, Bryce Canyon, Capitol Reef, Canyonlands and Zion. KUER’s Judy Fahys spoke with Vicki Varela, director of tourism for Utah, about preparations in case of a shutdown, which ultimately did begin over the weekend.

Erik Neumann / KUER

On this first Monday after the government shutdown was announced, Utah’s national parks and monuments remain open, but visitors will get slightly more of a wilderness experience than normal. 

Jacob B. Frank / National Park Service

Utah legislators want the federal government to reimburse the state for the money it spent keeping open its national parks during the government shutdown of 2013.

University of Utah

The latest federal government shutdown is estimated to have cost the US economy 24 billion dollars. It’s left many people wondering what can be done for the government to function more effectively. The University of Utah’s S.J. Quinney College of Law is working on coming up with some answers. The law school is hosting a symposium Friday examining the current challenges facing US governance and some practical solutions to those problems.

iStock.com

Utah Governor Gary Herbert says he expects the federal government will reimburse the state for the money spent to keep its five National Parks open in the final days of the shutdown.

Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams says because the county came forward last week with emergency funding, many area low-income moms and babies will continue to have access to food and baby formula. The supply arrived at the Utah Food Bank today.

KUED

Dealing with the federal government shutdown dominated  Utah Governor Gary Herbert’s monthly news conference on Thursday.  

DoD photo by Airman Allen Stokes, U.S. Air Force/Released

Federal workers and furloughed employees are holding a rally Thursday at the Ogden Federal Building to protest the government shutdown. Ogden-Clearfield is one of the top 10 metro areas in the country affected by the furloughs. Hill Air Force Base is Utah's largest employer with some 25,000 federal employees and contractors. 

Government Shutdown Delays Some Mortgage Loans

Oct 2, 2013

The federal government shutdown is delaying and even stopping some lenders from finalizing home loans. With the Internal Revenue Service closed for business, lenders are unable to obtain borrowers tax transcripts, which is a vital step in approving a mortgage. The US Department of Agriculture, which processes rural home loans is closed as well. 

Babs De Lay is the principal broker and owner of Urban Utah Homes and Estates. She says lenders, buyers and sellers are panicked.

Federal Shutdown Causes Many Utah WIC Clinics to Close

Oct 1, 2013
Brian Grimmett

The federally funded Women, Infants, and Children program, or WIC, is among the long list of services and benefits that are no longer available because of the government shut down. But what does that mean for Utahns?

Dan Bammes

As the clock ticks down on a possible shutdown of the federal government, Utah’s tourist industry is already hearing from worried visitors.  

Visitors to Utah’s five national parks could encounter locked gates if the government shuts down because Congress can’t agree on a funding bill.  Marian DeLay, the head of the Moab Travel Council, says foreign tourists in particular are telling Moab businesses they don’t want to get to Utah and find the parks closed.