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Photo of patch.
Rocio Hernandez / KUER

The South Salt Lake Police Department has added a new patch to its officers’ uniforms as they continue to mourn Officer David Romrell, who was killed by a burglary suspect two months ago.

Photo of organizaiton's booths.
Courtesy Utah Nonprofits Association

As the partial government shutdown stretches into its fourth week, Utah nonprofits are feeling the pressure, according to a survey by the Utah Nonprofits Association (UNA) which found that 10 percent of its members have seen in increase in the demand for services from furloughed workers.

Photo of Nate Salazar
Courtesy Nate Salazar

Nate Salazar was sworn in as the newest board member of the Salt Lake City School District on January 8. Salazar attended Bryant Middle School and graduated from East High School in 2004. He’s currently the only minority on the board for a district where more than half of the students are minorities. He also works in Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski’s office as the associate director of community empowerment. KUER’s Rocio Hernandez spoke with Salazar about what he hopes to accomplish and why he wanted to be on the board.

Suicide is currently the second leading cause of death for adolescents in the country. And in the Mountain West, youth suicide rates are double, and in some cases triple, the national average. Now, a new study shows parents are often unaware that their kids are struggling.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Photo of DOJ.
iStock.com / pabradyphoto

As the partial government shutdown drags toward its fifth week, immigration courts are another aspect of government caught in the middle of the standstill in Congress.

Photo of federal building.
Nicole Nixon / KUER

As the record-breaking government shutdown continues into its fourth week, state budget managers are preparing for portions of the federal government to remain closed for weeks or even months more. That could leave the state to pick up the tab for programs like nutritional assistance and unemployment claims from furloughed federal workers.

Photo of Murray Police car.
Wikimedia Commons.

Police have arrested two men suspected of involvement in Sunday’s shooting outside Fashion Place Mall in Murray, as some local lawmakers who were at the scene questioned the mall’s safety procedures.

Illustration of depression.
Renee Bright / KUER

Ahead of the upcoming legislative session, a Utah LGBTQ group is preparing a bill that would ban conversion therapy, a form of psychotherapy that purports to help people with same-sex attraction to become heterosexual.

Photo of Brighton sign.
Chelsea Naughton / KUER

Big Cottonwood Canyon’s early settlers were miners looking to make a fortune. Today’s residents call it home because of the canyon’s rich abundance of lush forest, waterfalls and mountain lakes.

Two People Shot At Fashion Place Mall In Murray

Jan 13, 2019
Murray police Detective and PIO Ken Bass
Erik Neumann / KUER

Two people were shot Sunday afternoon outside Fashion Place Mall in Murray, as law enforcement launched a manhunt in search of three suspects, police said.

Winter is when the federal government starts spending dollars to prepare for the wildfire season, but the ongoing shutdown has put some of this preparation in limbo.

Photo of Joshua Tree entrance sign.
National Parks Service

As the partial government shutdown stretches toward a third week, both the public and public employees alike are feeling the pain. But there’s another casualty: public information.

Photo of U.S. Capitol.
Nicole Nixon / KUER

For 30 years, Steve Bryant has worked as a cartography contractor — a map maker — for the National Forest Service.

Photo of Rep. Sandra Hollins.
Austen Diamond for KUER

The Utah state constitution was ratified in 1895, nearly three decades after slavery was abolished following the Civil War. Yet state lawmakers at the time allowed for one glaring exception to that law — permitting slavery or indentured servitude as punishment for certain crimes.

Photo of food bank.
Brian Albers / KUER

A backed-up line of grocery carts pushed by furloughed federal employees wound between aisles at the Catholic Community Services food pantry in Ogden, forcing Cheryl Meyers some tough choices.

Screenshot of President Trump's Address.
Screenshot AP

Reactions to President Trump’s Oval Office speech on Tuesday night fell predictably along party lines, though more Utah Republicans are openly embracing the president’s hardline stance of keeping the government shuttered as the impasse over wall funding persists.

Photo of David Bernhardt
U.S. Department of the Interior via Twitter

Despite the government shutdown, there's been a handover at the U.S. Department of the Interior. Former Secretary Ryan Zinke is out, deputy secretary David Bernhardt is in, with a continuance of the Trump Administration policy of energy dominance.

KUER's Diane Maggipinto spoke with Nate Hegyi of KUER's Mountain West News Bureau to sort it out, starting with Zinke's wins and losses.

Photo of craft beers.
iStock.com / EddieHernandezPhotography

If the impasse over President Trump’s proposed border wall makes it to Saturday morning, this will be the longest government shutdown in U.S. history. And it has an unlikely victim — craft beer.

Photo of Christ Stewart.
Kelsie Moore / KUER

After taking control of the House, Democrats now have the power to investigate President Trump. Utah GOP Congressman Chris Stewart says he might be open to that.

Pres. Donald Trump Illustration from NPR.
NPR

President Trump is addressing the nation about border security tonight (Tuesday, Jan. 8). Democratic leaders Nancy Pelosi and Charles Schumer will give a joint response immediately following. The government is partially shut down, with Trump in a stalemate with Democrats over funding for a wall along the southern border. Watch his remarks live.

Photo of San Juan County commission swearing in
Judy Fahys/KUER

MONTICELLO — In an historic first, Native Americans hold the majority on the San Juan County Commission following a packed swearing in ceremony Monday in Monticello.

Photo of closed road at Arches National Park.
Judy Fahys/KUER News

The U.S. Interior Department announced Sunday it will take the extraordinary step of using entrance fees for daily operations during the partial government shutdown.

Courtesy Liv Paggiarino | for The Salt Lake Tribune and The Guardian

In a story for The Salt Lake Tribune and The Guardian, reporter Nate Carlisle takes a deep dive into a polygamist community of about 400 people in Missouri. He traveled to what locals refer to as “the compound” — polygamist members call it “the ranch” — near Humansville, Missouri in November. KUER reporter Daysha Eaton talked with Carlisle about his reporting and what he learned about this little-known sect of Mormonism.

Photo of temple.
Lee Hale / KUER

As a single woman and member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Sara Vranes says she was led to believe she needed a man as an intermediary in her relationship with God. And that pained her. But at the beginning of 2019, the Salt Lake City resident said that changed because of new language and rituals in the Church that put women on equal footing with men.

Photo of old faithful.
Nate Hegyi / KUER

Unlike previous administrations, President Trump’s Interior Department has directed national parks to keep their gates open while furloughing most workers during this latest government shutdown. But as the partial shutdown enters its third week, critics argue the parks are becoming unsafe.

Photo of John Curtis.
Nicole Nixon / KUER

As the partial government shutdown enters its third week, roughly 800,000 federal workers are still without pay. Rep. John Curtis, R-Utah, said members of Congress should forfeit pay during government shutdowns, too.

iStock.com

The new report cards for Utah schools are out and they’re getting good grades from both teachers and administrators.

Photo of Capitol Reef closed.
StephenTrimble.com

As the partial government shutdown appeared likely to enter its third week, Utah’s tourism office assembled plans to fund another week of skeleton services at the state’s two busiest national parks.

Photo of Lisa Murkowski.
Office of U.S. Senator Lisa Murkowski (R-AK)

U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, may try to re-introduce landmark legislation that would address the crisis of missing and murdered indigenous women in the U.S.

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