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University Of Utah Investigates Possible Sexual Assault On Campus

This story will be updated. University of Utah police are investigating a possible sexual assault that occurred around 10:30 p.m. on Monday west of the Marriott Library, the university said in a statement.

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Sine Die! The 2019 Utah Legislature has adjourned. Catch up on what went down with 45 Days.

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U.S. Department of the Interior

Democrats are likely to question acting Interior Secretary David Bernhardt over his connections with industry during his senate confirmation hearing Thursday. The former oil and gas lobbyist has been criticized in recent months for appearing to help out clients he used to represent.

Image of Temple.
Brian Albers / KUER

There’s an understanding among Latter-day Saints: Change in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints happens from the top when God speaks through his prophet.

Photo of Matheson Courthouse.
Brian Albers / KUER

The Utah Supreme Court will hear arguments Monday morning against a controversial legislative rewrite of a voter-approved medical marijuana law.

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Flickr Creative Commons / David Sanborn / https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidmoore326/34981348496/in/photostream/

Dixie State University’s Board of Trustees voted today in support of a proposal to cut back a student fee that funds the student newspaper, the Dixie Sun News, for the 2019-20 academic year.

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Daysha Eaton / KUER

Religions across America are reckoning with how they address nontraditional members of their faith. The latest is the Methodist Church, which has at least 12 million members in the U.S. and approximately 80 million worldwide.

A Washington D.C. federal court decision has stopped future leasing on over 300,000 acres of Wyoming public lands. In 2016, several conservation groups raised concerns the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) was not reasonably considering the impact of oil and gas lease sales on climate change.

Photo of Hyde Park City Hall.
Daysha Eaton / KUER

This week, a petition began circulating calling for the Hyde Park City to fire it’s longtime Public Works Director, Mike Grunig, who allegedly pointed a gun at three other workers while on the job.

Julia Ritchey / KUER

Rob Anderson, chairman of the embattled Utah Republican Party, said Wednesday he will not seek a second two-year term, opting instead to step aside this spring in order to let someone else take over.

Photo of Dave Newlin.
Nicole Nixon / KUER

Police oversight advocates are calling on Gov. Gary Herbert to veto a bill that would limit powers of citizen review boards.

Courtesy Utah Division of Wildlife Resources

Ever since a hunter killed a nuisance cougar last fall in Eden, cougars have been spotted all along the Wasatch foothills from Layton to Olympus Cove and Herriman. Darren De Bloois, who oversees the game mammal program for the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, spoke with KUER’s Judy Fahys about the frequency of cougar encounters this year and why the season probably isn’t over yet.

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Wit's End

Tuesday, a conversation about wit and wittiness. Author James Geary says wit is more than just a knack for snappy comebacks. He calls it a “fundamental operating system of human creativity.”

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Podcast: 45 Days

Renee Bright/KUER

The 63rd session of the Utah Legislature concluded last night — a little early in fact — drawing to a close about an hour before midnight. Lawmakers outdid themselves this year, passing a record 573 bills. Not to mention balancing a record-setting budget of $19 billion, with bigger investments in air quality, school counselors and retirement benefits for public safety workers. Republican leaders set out with an ambitious agenda to tackle tax reform, which fizzled out. But they did a bunch of other stuff: hate crimes, a beer bill, criminal justice reform and a controversial overhaul of voter-approved Medicaid expansion.

Click here for more from "45 Days"

Update: Discount available through March 29.

NPR News

The Supreme Court appeared sharply divided on the question of whether there's any limit on what the courts can impose on partisan redistricting, also known as gerrymandering, with Justice Brett Kavanaugh, the newest member of the court, appearing at least somewhat conflicted.

"I took some of your argument in the briefs and the amicus briefs to be that extreme partisan gerrymandering is a real problem for our democracy," Kavanaugh told the lawyers arguing the case, "and I'm not going to dispute that."

A Spanish court says assailants who broke into North Korea's Embassy in Madrid last month later fled to the U.S.

According to new documents unsealed on Tuesday, the perpetrators of the attack included a U.S. citizen and another resident. The leader of the plot fled via Lisbon to Newark, N.J., and offered stolen material to the FBI in New York.

Updated at 5:35 p.m. ET

The House of Representatives failed to override President Trump's veto on a congressional resolution blocking his national emergency declaration. That executive proclamation paved the way for the administration to spend billions of dollars to construct a barrier along the Southwest border between the U.S. and Mexico after Congress refused to approve the full amount the White House demanded last year.

Updated at 3:20 p.m.

The first of more than 1,600 lawsuits pending against Purdue Pharma, the maker of the opioid OxyContin, has been settled.

The drugmaker has agreed to pay $270 million to fund addiction research and treatment in Oklahoma and pay legal fees.

Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter filed suit two years ago alleging Purdue helped ignite the opioid crisis with aggressive marketing of the blockbuster drug OxyContin and deceptive claims that downplayed the dangers of addiction.

Bump stocks — the gun add-ons that can dramatically increase their rate of fire — are now officially illegal in the U.S., after a Trump administration ban took effect Tuesday. Anyone selling or owning bump stocks could face up to 10 years in federal prison and a fine of $250,000 for each violation.

Chief Justice John Roberts declined to hear an appeal from gun makers on the new ban Tuesday, allowing it to remain in place. A separate appeal that seeks a stay on enforcing the ban is before Justice Sonia Sotomayor.

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