Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Scientists in Japan report finding a new superconducting material

Scientists in Japan report finding a new superconducting material. It's a readily available compound that's been around since the 1950s, but no one thought to check if it was superconducting at low temperatures until now. In this hour, we'll talk about what the new superconductor might mean for technology such as magnetic resonance imaging. Plus, President Bush is expected to decide soon on whether federal funds can be used for research on stem cells taken from human embryos. We'll hear about promising new research in the field and talk about some of the ethical considerations of this work. Scientists in Japan report finding a new superconducting material. It's a readily available compound that's been around since the 1950s, but no one thought to check if it was superconducting at low temperatures until now. In this hour, we'll talk about what the new superconductor might mean for technology such as magnetic resonance imaging. Plus, President Bush is expected to decide soon on whether federal funds can be used for research on stem cells taken from human embryos. We'll hear about promising new research in the field and talk about some of the ethical considerations of this work.

Scientists in Japan report finding a new superconducting material. It's a readily available compound that's been around since the 1950s, but no one thought to check if it was superconducting at low temperatures until now. In this hour, we'll talk about what the new superconductor might mean for technology such as magnetic resonance imaging. Plus, President Bush is expected to decide soon on whether federal funds can be used for research on stem cells taken from human embryos. We'll hear about promising new research in the field and talk about some of the ethical considerations of this work.

Scientists in Japan report finding a new superconducting material. It's a readily available compound that's been around since the 1950s, but no one thought to check if it was superconducting at low temperatures until now. In this hour, we'll talk about what the new superconductor might mean for technology such as magnetic resonance imaging. Plus, President Bush is expected to decide soon on whether federal funds can be used for research on stem cells taken from human embryos. We'll hear about promising new research in the field and talk about some of the ethical considerations of this work.

Scientists in Japan report finding a new superconducting material. It's a readily available compound that's been around since the 1950s, but no one thought to check if it was superconducting at low temperatures until now. In this hour, we'll talk about what the new superconductor might mean for technology such as magnetic resonance imaging. Plus, President Bush is expected to decide soon on whether federal funds can be used for research on stem cells taken from human embryos. We'll hear about promising new research in the field and talk about some of the ethical considerations of this work.

Scientists in Japan report finding a new superconducting material. It's a readily available compound that's been around since the 1950s, but no one thought to check if it was superconducting at low temperatures until now. In this hour, we'll talk about what the new superconductor might mean for technology such as magnetic resonance imaging. Plus, President Bush is expected to decide soon on whether federal funds can be used for research on stem cells taken from human embryos. We'll hear about promising new research in the field and talk about some of the ethical considerations of this work.

Copyright 2001 Fresh Air

Tags

KUER is listener-supported public radio. Support this work by making a donation today.