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Photo of a street sign on a highway that reads "Sunny Acres Lane."
Kate Groetzinger / KUER

Can New Ordinances For Spanish Valley Stop Construction of A 13-Acre Truck Stop? Probably Not.

MONTICELLO — From the potential construction of a 13-acre truck stop to the conversion of housing into overnight rentals to the loss of their dark night skies, people who moved to Spanish Valley for peace and quiet say their way of life is under threat.

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A recent report looking at the best states to work in doesn't show the Mountain West in a particularly good light. Only one state in our region ranked in the top half.

Photo of Lee Hale.
Renee Bright / KUER

As a reporter, Lee Hale says he was used to cutting himself out of the story — especially when it came to his personal faith experiences. With his latest project, though, he’s taking a different approach. He’s laying it all out there, and he hopes his guests will do the same. 

Photo of bagged medical marijuana and medicine bottles.
iStock.com / Patrick Morrissey

Utah’s medical cannabis law will continue to evolve as the state prepares to sell marijuana products next spring.

Ammon Bundy, who led an armed standoff with the federal government in an Oregon wildlife refuge, took to Facebook this past weekend. He said he failed a background check to buy a firearm -- and then things took a turn.  

Photo of three panelists signing a document as their colleagues look on.
Photo courtesy of Southern Utah University.

An agreement signed at the Utah Rural Summit on Tuesday might soon bring remote working jobs to rural parts of the state. 

Lawmakers in our region are meeting Thursday to discuss the potential economic windfalls from nuclear waste storage. It's the first meeting of Wyoming's Spent Fuel Rods Subcommittee, which was created earlier this year.

Photo of school board meeting.
Rocio Hernandez / KUER

The Salt Lake City Board of Education voted Tuesday night in favor of two resolutions that reaffirmed its commitment to protecting its immigrant students and families as the Trump administration ramps up immigration enforcement.

Photo of KUER studios.
Austen Diamond

Doug Fabrizio and his team spent the summer retooling and rethinking RadioWest. Starting Sept. 13, the show will return as a weekly program. Plus, view KUER's new fall program schedule.  

Photo of protesters and CECY sign.
Rocio Hernandez / KUER

Updated 6:33 p.m. MDT 9/3/19

A Salt Lake City activist has avoided deportation — for now — following protests against her removal last week, an immigrant rights group said Tuesday.

Photo of William Perry Pendley.
U.S. Department of the Interior

The newly-minted head of the Bureau of Land Management is defending himself after attracting the ire of environmental groups. They are concerned about potential conflicts of interest and his views on public lands. 

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NPR News

New York City Debates Repealing Conversion Therapy Ban

25 minutes ago

The New York City Council is considering a repeal of a 2017 law it passed that made conversion therapy — the strongly-condemned practice

A diver maintains an open-water cage where tuna are being farmed in Izmir, Turkey.

Mitchell, the chief foreign affairs correspondent for NBC News and anchor of her own MSNBC show, looks back on her career in journalism. She's receiving a lifetime achievement Emmy on Sept. 24.

Heavy rains are triggering flash floods in eastern Texas as Tropical Depression Imelda draws nearer in the Gulf of Mexico — one of several large storms that forecasters are watching closely Wednesday. In the Atlantic, Bermuda is under a hurricane warning as Hurricane Humberto nears the island as a Category 3 storm.

Researchers are beginning to understand why certain brain cancers are so hard to stop.

Three studies published Wednesday in the journal Nature found that these deadly tumors integrate themselves into the brain's electrical network and then hijack signals from healthy nerve cells to fuel their own growth.

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