News Brief: Remembering Fallen Officer Kirk T. Fuchigami | KUER 90.1

News Brief: Remembering Fallen Officer Kirk T. Fuchigami

Dec 6, 2019

Friday morning, December 6, 2019

State

Licensing Social Workers In Schools

Utah school social workers worry that a rule change will eliminate training necessary to work effectively with students. They fear their roles and relationships with their schools could change if school social workers are no longer required to have an educator license. The Utah State Board of Education heard their concerns on Thursday and is expected to decide in January if it will modify the rule. Read the full storyRocio Hernandez

Fallen U.S. Army Officer Returned To Utah

The remains of 25-year-old Army pilot Kirk T. Fuchigami Jr. will arrive back in Utah Saturday. The Chief Warrant Officer 2 died last month in Afghanistan when his helicopter crashed. He and another pilot who also perished were providing security for troops on the ground. In what is called a dignified transfer, Fuchigami's remains are scheduled to arrive at Ogden-Hinckley Airport. He will be received by his wife of eight months, MacKenzie Norman of Corinne, UT. Fuchigami's private funeral will be held on Monday in Brigham City, followed by his burial with full military honors and flyover at the city cemetery.— Diane Maggipinto

Region

Cyanide Bombs

The Trump Administration has reauthorized cyanide bombs, a controversial trap meant to protect livestock and threatened species. The tool is intended to control coyotes, which kill more cattle than any other predator. Conservation groups have fought to ban the trap which has been known to kill non-target animals, pets, and injure humans. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has revised rules to limit those downsides — that includes greater buffer areas around where the trap can be placed. But activists say there are plenty of non-lethal control methods. Ranching advocates said in a press release that cyanide traps help prevent hundreds of millions of dollars in annual losses. — Cooper McKim, Mountain West News Bureau

Nation

Religious Freedom And LGBT Rights

A new bill from Utah Republican Rep. Chris Stewart seeks to protect LGBT people from discrimination. The proposal also includes language that would allow religious organizations to provide services in accordance with religious beliefs that may exclude those of different sexual orientations or gender identities. Stewart introduced the bill Friday. Democrats in the House of Representatives and those running for president are throwing their support behind a more expansive anti-discrimination bill while Republicans warn about a risk to religious freedom. — Diane Maggipinto