Sunday Puzzle: Starting A New Phrase | KUER 90.1

Sunday Puzzle: Starting A New Phrase

Jun 28, 2020

On-air challenge: I'm going to read you some sentences. Three consecutive words somewhere in each sentence are the first three words of a familiar proverb or saying. Tell me what it is.

Example: My parents went to the restaurant at 5 p.m. to get the early bird special. --> The early bird catches the worm.

1. The queen attends every royal function, so her absence makes the crowd concerned.

2. The cows with two heads are the big attraction at the carnival.

3. A nice Scottish lad is what a miss is looking for.

4. I'm reading a Rolling Stone article about a new country artist.

5. At the amusement park, children should be at least eight to ride the rollercoaster.

6. At swim camp, Tammy learned the butterfly, while the counselors taught different strokes for the other swimmers.

7. At the Westminster show, every dog has a leash.

8. While marijuana prices vary from state to state, studies show the grass is cheapest in Oregon.

9. A foster home is where a child gets a new life.

10. Of all the qualities you want in a business partner, honesty is the most important.

Last week's challenge: Think of a famous person whose name consists of three names. The first and last letters of the first name plus the first and last letters of the second name plus the first and last letters of the third name, in order, name a city and lake in Europe. Who is it?

Challenge answer: Lulu Garcia-Navarro --> Lugano

Winner: Ellen Blackstone of Seattle

This week's challenge: This week's challenge comes from listener Ed Pegg Jr., who runs the website MathPuzzle.com. Think of a five-letter animal. Remove the middle letter, and two opposites remain. What animal is it?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you by Thursday, July 2nd, at 3 p.m. ET.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

And it's time to play The Puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Joining us is Will Shortz. He's puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster.

Hi, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Hey there, Lulu.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So remind us of last week's challenge.

SHORTZ: Yes. I said, think of a famous person whose name consists of three names. The first and last letters of the first name plus the first and last letters of the second name plus the first and last letters of the third name, in order, name a city and lake in Europe. What is it? And the answer is you, Lulu Garcia-Navarro. And those letters spell Lugano, the lake and resort in Switzerland.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: (Laughter) No way. You finally made me a puzzle question and answer.

SHORTZ: Now, let me tell you how this came about. I was just lying down, thinking of an idea for a puzzle. I had the idea for a three-name person. I went through dozens and dozens of them, couldn't find anything that spelled anything. And then I thought of you. And I think your name is unique. If any listener can find another famous three-name person whose first and last letters, you know, spell something, I'd love to hear. I think your name is unique.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Well, this makes me happy, even if I was the very last person that occurred to you since you talk to me every single week (laughter).

SHORTZ: That's funny.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: We received just under 600 correct responses. So I occurred to 600 other people, at least. And the winner this week is Ellen Blackstone of Seattle, Wash., my new favorite person in the world.

Congratulations and welcome to the program.

ELLEN BLACKSTONE: Thank you. Thank you.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: How did you figure it out?

BLACKSTONE: Well, my partner, Chris (ph), and I work on it together, and he started with Geneva. And we worked on Geneva for a while, and that didn't work. So Lugano then was on our whiteboard in our dining room for a few days, where we finally figured it out.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: And what do you do in Seattle?

BLACKSTONE: I work for a nonprofit radio show called BirdNote. It started in Seattle on our local NPR affiliate KPLU, now KNKX, several years ago.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That's why I occurred to you.

(LAUGHTER)

BLACKSTONE: I am an NPR junkie for decades. Absolutely. Absolutely.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: There you go. Are you ready to play The Puzzle?

BLACKSTONE: Yes, I am. Yes.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: You are. You are. I've got a good feeling about this one. Take it away, Will.

SHORTZ: All right. Ellen, I'm going to read you some sentences. Three consecutive words somewhere in each sentence are the first three words of a famous proverb or saying. Tell me what it is. For example, if I said, my parents went to the restaurant at 5 p.m. to get the early bird special, you would say the early bird catches the worm. So it's always the first three words of a familiar proverb or saying. And here's number one. The queen attends every royal function, so her absence makes the crowd concerned.

BLACKSTONE: Absence makes the heart grow fonder.

SHORTZ: Excellent. Number two - the cows with two heads are the big attraction at the carnival.

BLACKSTONE: Heads are better than one.

SHORTZ: Two heads are better than one. Good. A nice Scottish lad is what a miss is looking for.

BLACKSTONE: Oh. Could I hear that again?

SHORTZ: Yeah. A nice Scottish lad is what a miss is looking for.

BLACKSTONE: A miss is as good as a mile.

SHORTZ: Nice. I'm reading a Rolling Stone article about a new country artist.

BLACKSTONE: A rolling stone gathers no moss.

SHORTZ: Excellent. At the amusement park, children should be at least 8 to ride the roller coaster.

BLACKSTONE: Children should be seen and not heard.

SHORTZ: Good. At swim camp, Tammy learned the butterfly while the counselors taught different strokes for the other swimmers.

BLACKSTONE: Different strokes for different folks.

SHORTZ: Good. At the Westminster show, every dog has a leash.

BLACKSTONE: Oh. Every dog has its day.

SHORTZ: That's it. While marijuana prices vary from state to state, studies show the grass is cheapest in Oregon.

BLACKSTONE: The grass is always greener on the other side or something like that.

SHORTZ: That's it - the other side of the fence. A foster home is where a child gets a new life.

BLACKSTONE: Home is where the heart is.

SHORTZ: That's it. Man, oh, man. Here's your last one. Of all the qualities you want in a business partner, honesty is the most important.

BLACKSTONE: Honesty is the best policy.

SHORTZ: Oh, man. Ellen, that was fantastic.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Oh, and so it is. Didn't I tell you you were going to do great? How do you feel?

BLACKSTONE: Oh, I'm relieved. And I swear I'll never enter again. I promise.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: What? That's - wait a second. That's not supposed to be the way you come out of this (laughter).

BLACKSTONE: I know. It's just anxiety-producing.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Well, you did great, as I predicted. For playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. And Ellen, which member station do you listen to?

BLACKSTONE: We're members of both KNKX and KUOW in Seattle.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Ellen Blackstone of Seattle, Wash., thank you so much for playing The Puzzle.

BLACKSTONE: Thanks. It was great.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right, Will. What is next week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yes. It comes from listener Ed Pegg Jr., who runs the website MathPuzzle.com. Think of a five-letter animal. Remove the middle letter, and two opposites remain. What animal is it? So again, a five-letter animal. Drop the middle letter, and two opposites will remain. What animal is it?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: When you have the answer, go to our website, npr.org/puzzle, and click on the submit your answer link. Remember, just one entry per person, please. Our deadline for entries is Thursday, July 2, at 3 p.m. Eastern. Include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you're the winner, we will give you a call, and you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster Will Shortz.

Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thanks, Lulu.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.