2020 Election | KUER 90.1

2020 Election

Photo of fireworks at Sugarhouse Park in Salt Lake City.
Mike Renlund via Flickr

  Friday morning, July 24, 2020

Photo of the University of Utah football stadium
Brian Albers / KUER

Wednesday evening, July 1, 2020

Photo of two men sitting in grey armchairs.
Screenshot via Facebook

All four Republican candidates for governor participated in a forum hosted by the LGBTQ advocacy group Equality Utah Thursday. 

stevebott / Flickr

After changes to controversial superdelegate rules, the role of delegates in the Democratic Party is evolving. KUER’s Caroline Ballard spoke with University of Utah political science professor Matthew Burbank about what that means for the upcoming Democratic Convention. 

Photo of a polling place at a Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Salt Lake City
Sonja Hutson / KUER

Tuesday was the first time Utah participated in Super Tuesday. To get a better picture of everything in play in the primary, KUER’s Caroline Ballard spoke with University of Utah political science professor Matthew Burbank. 

After nearly a day-long delay, the Iowa Democratic Party started releasing results from the Monday night caucuses. The party blamed a "coding issue" with the app for its inability to release results after the caucuses, as campaigns and voters waited in anticipation.

Only 41 delegates are at stake, but Iowa is known for helping to make or break a presidential candidates' momentum. Now, the meltdown over results is prompting renewed criticism of the state's process and first-in-the-nation status.

Illustration of 2020 shaped glasses with a podium and ballot reflected in the lenses.
Renee Bright / KUER

Impeachment. A pivotal presidential election. The 2020 Census. Tax reform. And … The Real Housewives of Salt Lake City. Along with the perennial topics of growth, environment and healthcare, those are a few of the stories — big and small — we’ll be following this year. Here are 10 other stories to watch for 2020.

Elaine Clark / KUER

 


At a rally last November in Las Vegas, a reporter noted Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet’s experience leading Denver Public Schools, and asked the presidential candidate, “With your experience in the education area, [how] would you use that experience as president to help the education system?”

It’s an unremarkable question—except for the fact that it was posed by a 12-year-old.

Photo of Gov. Steve Bullock.
Gov. Steve Bullock via Facebook

Another one bites the dust. 

Gov. Steve Bullock, D-Mont., is the latest candidate from the Mountain West to drop out of the 2020 presidential race.

Illustration of microphones.
Angela Hsieh / NPR

Ten candidates are taking the stage for the November Democratic Debate in Atlanta, amid public hearings in the impeachment inquiry into President Trump. NPR reporters will be providing fact checks and analysis throughout the debate. Coverage is scheduled to begin at 6:30 p.m. MST.

Photo of Mike Lee
Isaac Hale / Daily Herald

U.S. Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, admitted Friday he “took the scenic route” to becoming a supporter of President Donald Trump.

Photo of Ambassador Jon Huntsman.
Kelsie Moore / KUER

Jon Huntsman Jr. recently returned to Utah after a two-year stint as U.S. ambassador to Russia. Huntsman served as Governor of Utah from 2005 until 2009, when he was tapped by the Obama administration to be the ambassador to China.

Illustration of microphones.
Angela Hsieh / NPR

Twelve candidates take the stage for October's Democratic primary debate, which begins at 6 p.m. MT. Follow along as NPR reporters share context and analysis throughout the debate.

Photo of the Utah Governor's Mansion in Salt Lake City.
Wikimedia Commons

This story has been corrected

Labor Day marks the unofficial end of summer and the unofficial start of campaign season ahead of big election years — and 2020 will be a huge one.

Congressman Ben McAdams
Kelsie Moore / KUER

As Republicans begin lining up to challenge freshman Congressman Ben McAdams, the democratic representative’s campaign says he is prepared for another tough race just six months into his first term.

The Mountain West is a pretty conservative place. So when Democrats win here… it’s big news. And now two Democratic governors from the region are mulling a run for president.

Colorado’s John Hickenlooper and Montana’s Steve Bullock are both moderate progressives, both won in fairly conservative places, and both are kind of wonky.

“They’re not that person who can command a crowd,” Lee Banville, a political journalism professor at the University of Montana, says.

Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox says he hasn’t made a final decision about running for governor in 2020. But there’s mounting proof that the popular Republican will make the plunge, including his new podcast, called “Cox & Friends,” a play on the conservative Fox News morning show.

Peter Cooke Called as LDS Mission President

Jan 10, 2013

Retired U.S. Army Major General Peter Cooke was the Democratic Party nominee for governor of Utah in the 2012 election, but lost to the Republican incumbent, Gary Herbert.  He says it was a surprise when church leaders asked him to be a mission president a few days ago.  He doesn't yet know where he'll be assigned among the church's 350 missions worldwide, but he says his wife Heather and their four children are delighted with the opportunity to serve.

In his concession speech, Governor Mitt Romney prayed that the president will be successful in guiding the nation.  Shortly after that, LDS Church leaders invited Americans  - whatever their political persuasion - to pray for the President and the new Congress.  Now LDS Democrats are calling for a day of prayer.  Caucus chair Steve Olsen told KUER the prayers are directed at leaders on both sides of the aisle. 

November 07, 2012

Who Won and Why

Dan Jones, President, Dan Jones & Associates
Frank Pignanelli, Weekly Political Columnist for Deseret News
LaVarr Webb, Publisher, Utah Policy Daily, Weekly Political Columnist for Deseret News
Doug Foxley, Attorney-at-Law Partner Foxley and Pignanelli, Nationally Recognized Political Consultant

Election 2012 Slideshow

Nov 6, 2012
Brian Grimmett

Take a look at some of the sights from the Utah Republican and Democratic election night HQ's. Let us know which ones are your favorites in the comments.

KUER's Election 2012 Recap

Nov 5, 2012

Utah Governor

Republican Gary Herbert secured his second term in office last night, breezing past Democrat Peter Cooke by more than 36,000 votes.

Just before 11 pm, General Peter Cooke arrived unexpectedly at GOP headquarters to congratulate Governor Gary Herbert on his win. Cooke said he tried calling the governor first but he didn’t pick up. Cooke later returned to the Democratic headquarters to concede, saying Utahns need to continue fighting for education.

State School Board Selection Process Challenged

Nov 4, 2012
Utah State Office of Education

The process for which Utah elects members to the State Board of Education is shrouded in controversy. So much that two lawsuits have been filed against the state calling for an end to the method altogether. Some say it has manufactured a conservative group of education bosses that don’t represent the community. But those who support the system say candidates are better qualified for the job than ever and more willing to collaborate with state lawmakers to make tough choices.

Courtesy of the Utah Attorney General's Office

Next week voters will choose the next chief law enforcement officer for the state of Utah. The Attorney General is part criminal prosecutor – part political adviser and the two candidates vying for the job have very different ideas on how to do it right. 

Inside his office on the second floor of the state capitol, Utah Attorney General Mark Shurtleff says he’s ready to move on.  The 55-year-old Republican has held the job of the state’s chief legal advisor for 12 years and he’s proud of his efforts to protect Utahn’s while also navigating the political pitfalls of the job.

Salt Lake County

Salt Lake County Mayor Peter Corroon endorsed the Regional Park and Trails bond today during an open house at the Northwest Recreation center. If approved, The Regional Park and Trails bond, or Proposition #1, authorizes the county to issue a $47 million dollar bond. The money would be used to help finish the Jordan River Parkway Trail, Parley’s Trail, and build three new regional parks. Salt Lake County Mayor Peter Corroon says the benefits of approving the proposition far outweigh the property tax increase.

KUER News Pod: Thursday November 1, 2012

Nov 1, 2012

Redistricting adds to the intrigue of Utah’s 68th district race, Lieutenant Governor candidates debate about the economy and education, and the 4th Congressional race breaks a Utah record.

District 68: Race to Represent Rural Utah

Nov 1, 2012
House District 68
vote.utah.gov

It’s been 20 years since Merrill Nelson served one term in the Utah House of Representatives, but this year’s legislative redistricting has given him the opportunity to seek another.  He’s a Republican who lives in Grantsville, and the new boundaries of District 68 divide Tooele County and extend all the way to Milford in Beaver County.  Most of Juab County, including Eureka, is also now in District 68, and that’s where the Democratic candidate, Tom Nedreberg, comes from.

Lieutenant Governor Candidates Square Off

Oct 31, 2012

Education, the economy and voter turnout were the focus of Utah’s only Lieutenant Governor’s debate. Less than a week away from the election, Republican Lieutenant Governor Greg Bell joined Democratic candidate Vince Rampton this morning at Utah State University in Logan.  

Democrat Vince Rampton says he would be a pro-active Lieutenant governor, tackling Utah’s low voter turnout and one-party rule by reforming lax campaign finance laws, expanding voter outreach and reducing lobbyist control in the legislature. He says these factors have led to helplessness among voters.

Utah’s 2nd Congressional District has been overshadowed by the newly added 4th District this election year.   The race between Jim Matheson and Mia Love has attracted national attention as well as money from out of state, while candidates in the recently redrawn 2nd District have had little time in the spotlight. 

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