Darrien Hunt | KUER 90.1

Darrien Hunt

Photo of mural.
Chelsea Naughton / KUER

Updated 1:42 p.m. MDT 7/22/2020

A dozen portraits of people who were killed by police have been painted on a building in Salt Lake City following the deaths of George Floyd in Minneapolis and Bernardo Palacios-Carbajal in Salt Lake City.

The art, installed by a group of about 20 unnamed artists, is part of a larger, ongoing movement in which thousands of people have marched in the streets across Utah to protest police brutality and racial injustice.

Photo of a large crowd of protesters in Salt Lake City
Kelsie Moore for KUER

Friday marks the fourth year that Utah has officially recognized Juneteenth as a state holiday. It dates back to 1865, when the last enslaved people were freed in Texas. African-Americans celebrate it as their Independence Day. But this year’s celebration comes as the nation and the state are gripped by protests against racial injustice and police brutality.

Whittney Evans

U.S. District Court Judge Tena Campbell heard arguments today concerning whether Darrien Hunt’s mother Susan Hunt agreed to a settlement with the city of Saratoga Springs. Police there shot and killed her 22-year-old son in 2014.

Courtesy of the Darrien Hunt family

New evidence suggests Darrien Hunt’s mother, Susan Hunt, did agree to a settlement with the city of Saratoga Springs over the September 2014 shooting death of her son by police officers. 

Tim slover

  The family of 22-year-old Darrien Hunt, who was killed by two Saratoga Springs police officers last September, filed a lawsuit in a Salt Lake City federal court Friday morning.

via Darrien Hunt Facebook page

A police report confirms an officer involved in the September shooting death of 22-year-old Darrien Hunt was wearing a body camera at the time of the incident. But officials say the camera was not on.

Whittney Evans

The Salt Lake branch of the NAACP is asking the U.S. Justice Department to investigate the death of 22-year-old black man Darrien Hunt. Hunt was shot and killed by Saratoga Springs police officers back in September. 

Whittney Evans

The two Saratoga Springs police officers involved in the shooting death of 22-year-old Darrien Hunt will not be charged with a crime. The Utah County Attorney’s office says the use of deadly force was legally justified. 

At 9:40 a.m., on September 10th, Saratoga Springs Police officers Matt Schauerhamer and Nicholas Judson were dispatched to an area near Redwood Road and State Route 73. A 9-1-1 caller had reported a suspicious man wielding a samurai sword. According to an investigation by the Utah County Attorney’s office, officers arrived at the scene to find Darrien Hunt.

Brian Grimmett

The Utah County Attorney investigating the police shooting of Darrien Hunt says their investigation is almost over.

Utah County Attorney Tim Taylor says the Utah Medical Examiner’s autopsy report released Tuesday shed some light on the events that happened on the day of the shooting, but that their investigation had already uncovered many other details. A search warrant the courts unsealed on Wednesday revealed some of those, including a narrative of the incident.

Utah Office of the Medical Examiner

Attorneys for the family of Darrien Hunt released the official state autopsy report Tuesday. The 22-year-old was shot and killed by a Saratoga Springs police officer in September.

Whittney Evans

The family of the 22-year-old black man who was shot and killed by police outside a Saratoga Springs strip mall earlier this month is calling on the U.S. Department of justice to look into the case. Relatives say Darrien Hunt’s civil rights were violated because he wasn’t breaking any laws.

Whittney Evans

The 22-year-old black man who was shot and killed by Saratoga Springs Police last week was laid to rest in Sandy Thursday afternoon.  The funeral took place at an LDS church not far from where he died.

There was little discussion of the circumstances surrounding Darrien Hunt’s death which is still being investigated by Utah County Attorney’s office.  It was a solemn service, broken up by a few moments of joyful tears and laughter. The press was allowed to attend the funeral, but recording devices were not allowed inside the service.