education | KUER 90.1

education

Photo of fireworks at Sugarhouse Park in Salt Lake City.
Mike Renlund via Flickr

  Friday morning, July 24, 2020

Multi-story, tan brick school building with large windows.
Courtesy Logan City School District

With the start of a new school year less than a month away for some of Utah’s public schools, most have at least a rough plan for what their returns will look like. 

Photo of an empty classroom
iStock.com / Ridofranz

The coronavirus pandemic has fundamentally altered education in Utah, when learning was forced from the classroom to the computer. For some teachers, the ongoing challenges of online learning, along with an uncertain health risk come fall, have them questioning if they can stick with teaching. 

The University of Utah sign in front a tree-filled quad.
Brian Albers / KUER

Beyond the increasing cost of attendance, college students face a barrage of other mandatory fees, ranging from textbooks to administrative taxes. And at at least two Utah public colleges, those additional fees have been on the rise over the past decade. Some are also getting tacked on unfairly, according to a state audit released Tuesday. 

Photo of small chairs on a small table in a classroom
blanscape via iStock

State and local leaders are working towards issuing guidelines for how Utah’s K-12 public school districts and charters can reopen in the fall. 

Photo of Utah State Board of Education Building
Courtesy of Utah State Board of Education

Members of Utah’s Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee met Wednesday to discuss up to $380 million in possible cuts to the state’s education funding. The hearing is part of a larger effort from Utah lawmakers to balance the state’s budget, which is projected to lose up to $1.3 billion in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. 

Illustration of a student at a table with a backpack gathering dust.
Renee Bright / KUER

Audri Robbinson is worried about her kids. Like many parents, she became a second teacher to them after state leaders announced in-person classes would be temporarily suspended in March. But it's been an ongoing challenge to keep Vincent, 4th grade, and Viauna, 2nd grade, engaged outside the classroom. 

Photo of a campus map on the Utah State University campus
Brian Albers / KUER

Public universities throughout Utah and the country received money as part of the federal CARES Act, an economic relief package in response to the coronavirus pandemic. Institutions, though, are required to disburse half of that funding to students. 

A young Navajo girl works on a laptop in a living room decorated with Native American weavings
Courtesy of Celia Black

Briana Lee is a junior at Monument Valley High School. She received her hotspot last week, and said it’s already helping her get more work done. But after three or four hours, she usually maxes out her daily data allotment. 

Illustration of a video classroom.
Toltemara / iStock.com

Teaching can be a hard job. Add in a global pandemic and statewide campus closures, and it becomes even harder. Now, with those closures extended at least through the end of the academic year, teachers like Amelia Landay have a long road ahead. 

Photo of University of Utah entrance sign.
Lee Hale / KUER

With online classes now the norm for most of the country’s schools and universities, students are adapting to learn in new ways. At the same time, many of the traditional benchmarks required in college applications — standardized testing and extracurricular activities — have largely been postponed or canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic. 

Photo of Monument Valley High School Sign that reads
Kate Groetzinger / KUER

MONUMENT VALLEY, Utah — Like most parents, Sheila Holiday is struggling to teach her three children math at home while schools are closed because of COVID-19. But unlike many other parents, she can’t just go online and watch a YouTube video to help explain calculus and fractions, because of where she lives. 

Photo of a campus map on the Utah State University campus
Brian Albers / KUER

The Utah System of Higher Education Board of Regents voted Thursday to raise tuition at seven of the state’s eight public universities. 

Photo of a school bus
Tina Carter / Millard County School District

As schools and businesses gear up for closures, school districts in Utah are looking for ways to keep learning going outside the classroom.

Photo of a woman talking at a podium.
Jon Reed / KUER

Updated 11:27 a.m. MDT 3/15/2020

Gov. Gary Herbert announced Friday afternoon that all public schools in the state will be dismissed starting Monday, March 16. 

A pump jack at dusk surrounded by sagebrush
Kate Groetzinger / KUER

Wednesday evening, Mar. 4, 2020

Photo of school bus.
MovieAboutYou / iStock.com

A Utah House committee is divided over whether to require restorative justice for minors who make threats against a school. 

Renee Bright / KUER

It’s 6:30 a.m. on a recent weekday morning, and Caroline Keeney is trying to get her two teen daughters ready for school. She knocks on the door of her younger daughter, Eden, and the 13-year-old middle schooler jumps right out of bed. 

Picture of a female lawmaker introducing a bill.
Rocio Hernandez

Assistant Minority Whip and State Sen. Jani Iwamoto, D-Holladay, introduced S.B. 80, a bill that seeks to study law enforcement departments at Utah public colleges and universities. A final report would be presented to the Education and Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice interim committees. 

A photo of smog over downtown Salt Lake City.
Brian Albers / KUER

Wednesday evening, Jan. 29, 2020

Photo of a woman speaking at the forum.
Rocio Hernandez

Over the last 10 years, more college students nationwide have reported feeling depressed, hopeless and angry, said Dr. David Reetz with the Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors. Reetz was the keynote speaker at Utah’s first Student Safety Forum focused on colleges and universities.

3 bikers cycle a road with a scenic red rock backdrop.
NPS/Neal Herbert

 Tuesday morning, Jan. 14, 2020

Photo of Rodney Chatman sitting at a table in a police uniform.
Courtesy of the University of Utah

The University of Utah has selected Rodney Chatman, the executive director of public safety and chief of police at the University of Dayton, as its new police chief. 

Photo of students raising their hands in a classroom.
iStock

Thursday evening, January 2, 2020

Photo of a bus stop on the University of Utah campus.
Brian Albers / KUER

Monday evening, December 9, 2019

A woman sits at a long table speaking into a microphone at a public hearing. Two men and three women sit next to her.
Rocio Hernandez / KUER

Social workers in Utah schools say they face difficult problems on a daily basis: students dealing with trauma, mental health problems and other social needs.

Digitized copy of the front page of the Salt Lake Telegram on Dec. 5, 1933.
Utah Digital Newspapers / J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah

Thursday evening, December 5, 2019

After nearly two weeks of protest, Brigham Young University-Idaho is apologizing and reversing its decision that would’ve barred students from enrolling if Medicaid was their only form of health insurance.


Woman in prison uniform sits in a classroom.
Rocio Hernandez / KUER

Robin Radcliff has her strategies to deal with distractions when she needs to study for her college-level classes: earplugs and headphones to muffle whatever clatter is happening around her.

Photo of a room full of people raising their hands in a sign meaning "love" in American Sign Language.
David Fuchs / KUER

WASHINGTON, Utah — The Utah State Charter School Board voted unanimously on Thursday not to close Saint George Academy.

Pages