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Features

Driving in the Mountain West can sometimes be a little hairy. Curvy mountain roads with steep inclines and declines, plus heavy snow and hail in the winter can make roads dangerous. Now, imagine doing it in an 80-foot long, 80,000-pound eighteen-wheeler. You're going to need more than Drivers' Ed.

Renee Bright / KUER

It’s 3 a.m. and Corey Ellis can’t sleep. He’s supposed to be on the road in a few hours, but the chronic pain in his hands and feet are bothering him. On this night, there’s another thing keeping him awake: anxiety.

It's late May in Wyoming. It snowed last night, and more snow is predicted. That's why it's good that Big Piney Rancher Chad Espenscheid is behind the wheel of the truck. The roads are sloppy and Middle Piney Creek is running high.

The Colorado River is short on water. But you wouldn’t know it by looking at a slate of proposed water projects in the river’s Upper Basin states of Colorado, Utah and Wyoming.

The river and its tributaries provide water for 40 million people in the Southwest. For about the last 20 years, demand for water has outstripped the supply, causing its largest reservoirs to decline.

Photo of turn farm.
Judy Fahys / KUER

The drive behind a massive water development project in southwestern Utah, the Lake Powell Pipeline, shows no signs of slowing even after the Colorado River Basin states signed a new agreement this spring that could potentially force more conservation or cutbacks.

Photo of Nathan Ivie and horse.
Kelsie Moore / KUER

Utah County Commissioner Nathan Ivie made headlines — and perhaps history – last month when he came out publicly as gay.

On a recent rainy Wednesday, across the street from Salt Lake City’s Temple Square, Mirella Cardoso faced a not totally inconsequential choice: what kind of cookies to eat at the new Crumbl store inside City Creek’s Deseret Book.

Photo of mesa arch crowd.
Kirk D. Keyes, Keyesphoto.com copyright 2019

CANYONLANDS NATIONAL PARK, UTAH — The dark blue, predawn sky was just beginning to brighten over Mesa Arch — a once-hidden gem in southern Utah — as Jonathan Zhang frantically set up his camera and tripod.

Photo of factory.
Courtesy S&S

The U.S.-China trade war is making for one long bumpy ride at S&S Worldwide.

Photo of Wankier.
Erik Neumann / KUER

Across the country pregnancy-related maternal mortality has been on the rise in recent years.

Photo of Yellowstone Entrance Sign.
Maggie Mullen

It’s no secret that in peak season Yellowstone National Park is getting really, really crowded these days.

Photo of Victoria.
Rocio Hernandez / KUER

The opera singer draws her breathe, and exhales. Then, a powerful voice bursts from her core.

“You now sue and you now win on my son’s broken back.”

It’s a voice she inherited from her grandmother who encouraged her to sing while they worked in the fields of Lesotho in southern Africa.

Renee Bright / KUER

This weekend, hundreds of thousands of people will gather to mark the completion of the transcontinental railroad in Utah 150 years ago.

Photo of Robin Hatch.
Erik Neumann / KUER

A gun show may not be the first place you would expect to talk about suicide prevention — especially in Vernal, Utah, where firearms are deeply embedded in the local culture.  

Photo of a Palm Sunday procession.
Daysha Eaton / KUER

On a recent morning before Sunday services, some of Salt Lake City’s poorest residents arrive at First United Methodist Church, where Jim Ecker helps serve them an early breakfast.

This might surprise you, but Americans seem to be losing their taste for beer. Even the dizzy growth we've seen in the microbrew industry is slowing down. Craft beer producers are trying to buck this trend, which involves figuring out how to be competitive with each other as well as the newer kid on the block: craft spirits.

Photo of Bilal.
Rocio Hernandez / KUER

When Kholoud Abou Arida, Moawiyah Bilal and their three children arrived in Salt Lake City in 2014 after fleeing their war-torn homeland in Syria, they were a different kind of Utah pioneer.

Photo of Bluff Mayor Ann Leppanen and Bluff Town Councilman Brant Murray standing in redrock country.
Judy Fahys / KUER

BLUFF — This recently incorporated town in San Juan County is facing a new test of newfound political clout as a solar farm is being proposed inside the disputed boundaries of the original Bears Ears National Monument.

Kelsie Moore / KUER

In spite of deep political division in Congress and across the country, Utah’s freshman Sen. Mitt Romney has been pleasantly surprised by how “collegial” his fellow senators are.

Daysha Eaton / KUER

 

Sidney Draughon’s first brush with Brigham Young University’s Honor Code Office came out of nowhere in 2015.

photo of horses.
Nate Hegyi / KUER

TOOELE – From behind the wheel of a gray Jeep Wrangler, Rob Hammer scans a high-desert landscape in search of an elusive American icon.

Photo of worker sorting bottles.
Erik Neumann / KUER

Inside a converted office building in a Midvale business park, about a dozen people are hard at work. Two women sort a tangle of coat hangers onto a rack for a dry cleaning company. Several others are busy ripping plastic covers off cans from a nearby medical supply company so the metal may be recycled.

If you kill a wolf in Idaho, your effort might be worth $1,000. 

A nonprofit in North Idaho covers costs for hunters and trappers who successfully harvest wolves. The group, called the Foundation for Wildlife Management pays up to $1,000 per wolf harvest.

 


Image of Temple.
Brian Albers / KUER

There’s an understanding among Latter-day Saints: Change in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints happens from the top when God speaks through his prophet.

Photo of Arent.
Judy Fahys / KUER

Utah’s growing interest in environmental issues has translated into an explosion of environmental legislation and budget requests in the 2019 General Session.

Renee Bright / KUER

 

The details on the lengthy federal investigation exonerating Chris Lehnertz of creating a hostile work environment were released Tuesday.

Mohan Sudabattula, a senior at the University of Utah, shows posters he found on campus from the white nationalist group Patriot Front.
Nate Hegyi / KUER

 


When University of Utah senior Mohan Sudabattula found the posters hanging recently from the side of the art building on campus, the first-generation son of immigrants from southeastern India was surprised but not shocked. He’d seen similar posters – the red, white and blue lettering – popping up all over campus.

The closest that Travis Rupp came to getting fired, he says, was the time he tried to make chicha. The recipe for the Peruvian corn-based beer, cobbled together from bits of pre-Incan archaeological evidence, called for chewed corn partially fermented in spit. So, Rupp’s first task had been to convince his colleagues to gather round a bucket and offer up their chompers for the cause.

Shortly after Emily Goodwin relocated her family across the country, they got some big news.   

“We found out we were pregnant less than a month after we moved here and that was a huge surprise,” says Goodwin, who has a homestead in Melba, Idaho.

 


Photo of Fuentes.
Kelsie Moore / KUER

Note that this story discusses suicide.

Standing alone on stage at the Salt Lake Public Library auditorium, Arturo Fuentes takes a deep breath, and begins to tell his story of torment.

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