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Daysha Eaton / KUER

 

Sidney Draughon’s first brush with Brigham Young University’s Honor Code Office came out of nowhere in 2015.

Screenshot of body camera footage.
Salt Lake City Police Department

The Salt Lake Unified Police Department board of directors is considering whether to continue funding the use of body cameras for officers.

New Zealanders just held a national memorial for the victims of the recent terror attacks there.  Muslim communities are still reeling from the tragedy – including here in the Mountain West.  


Photo of cows.
Judy Fahys / KUER

Colorado residents Rose Chilcoat and her husband, Mark Franklin, were leaving southeastern Utah’s Bears Ears National Monument after a camping trip in April 2017 when they were pulled over by three cowboys in a pickup truck.

Photo of press conference.
Nicole Nixon / KUER

Abortion rights advocates are asking a federal judge to block a controversial new law restricting abortions after 18 weeks gestation from taking effect next month.

Renee Bright / KUER

The recent news that The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints would now allow children of LGBTQ people to be blessed and baptised came right on time for the growing family of Kevin Kolditz.

The Me Too movement is changing the conversation about sexual violence. For some women, it's been empowering but, also, a painful reminder of buried trauma. And for some men, it's been a realization that they want to do more to change the status quo. One victim advocacy group in Wyoming wants to help men make that change by giving them better tools.

Screenshot of app landing page.
Richard Medina, Emily Nicolosi

As the number of active white nationalist groups continues to rise across the country and the Mountain West, researchers at the University of Utah have unveiled a new app that lets people anonymously report hate crimes and speech.

Brian Albers / KUER

Fifteen law enforcement officers from three jurisdictions are on administrative leave after a major shooting, police chase and the suspect’s death Monday — an incident which officials say could have been much worse.

Soil erosion in the West is getting worse. And that’s creating more dust – which isn’t good for ecosystems, human health or the economy.

photo of horses.
Nate Hegyi / KUER

TOOELE – From behind the wheel of a gray Jeep Wrangler, Rob Hammer scans a high-desert landscape in search of an elusive American icon.

Photo of worker sorting bottles.
Erik Neumann / KUER

Inside a converted office building in a Midvale business park, about a dozen people are hard at work. Two women sort a tangle of coat hangers onto a rack for a dry cleaning company. Several others are busy ripping plastic covers off cans from a nearby medical supply company so the metal may be recycled.

Photo of Russel M. Nelson.
Intellectual Reserve, Inc.

The biggest news of the 189th General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints may have been a policy change that happened before the event even began.

Renee Bright / KUER

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints announced Thursday the rollback of a 2015 policy which restricted baptism of children of gay couples and called them apostates.

Flickr Creative Commons / Bureau of Reclamation

U.S. Interior Secretary David Bernhardt has been accused by Democratic lawmakers and nonprofit accountability groups of violating ethics rules, prompting a review by that agency’s inspector general.

Screenshot photo of Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski
Screenshot: / U.S. House Subcommittee on Environment and Climate Change

Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski on Tuesday joined other state and local leaders in sharing tips on combating climate change with Congress.

Photo of hate crimes bill signing.
Utah Senate

A years-long effort to add teeth to Utah’s hate crimes law culminated in a signing ceremony by Gov. Gary Herbert Tuesday.

The Climate Prediction Center forecasts a warmer spring than usual in the Mountain West.

Rocio Hernandez / KUER

With the 2020 U.S. Census one year away, state officials are planning strategies to get more Utahns to participate.

Photo of Park Building.
Brian Albers / KUER

After two long days of debate on tuition and student fee increases, all but two state regents voted in favor of raising costs at seven of the state’s public colleges and universities.

iStock.com / manusapon kasosod

Listening to Mozart may help drastically reduce pain and inflammation, according to a new study from researchers at University of Utah Health published in the peer-reviewed journal Frontiers of Neurology.

Renee Bright / KUER

Utah’s long waited Medicaid expansion proposal will move ahead. Officials received word from the federal government today that the state has received approval with the first stage of its Medicaid expansion plan, which is slated to start on Monday, April 1.

If you kill a wolf in Idaho, your effort might be worth $1,000. 

A nonprofit in North Idaho covers costs for hunters and trappers who successfully harvest wolves. The group, called the Foundation for Wildlife Management pays up to $1,000 per wolf harvest.

 


Acting Interior Secretary David Bernhardt faced fiery questions during his senate confirmation hearing Thursday.

 


iStock.com / bernardbobo

Utah drivers could soon be able to throw their wallets out the window under a new law permitting digital driver’s licenses.

A new study out of our region shows that when more women are involved in group-decision making about natural resources, conservation gets a boost.

Austen Diamond for KUER

Utah lawmakers often pride themselves as a deliberative, decision-making body, spending just 45 days each year to pass legislation, but new research may suggest otherwise.

Image of Luis Garza.
Erik Neumann / KUER

This week, the Utah Supreme Court takes on the question of whether immigrants who came to the United States illegally can work as lawyers in the state.

State Attorney General's Office

Opponents of the Affordable Care Act in Utah have reason to celebrate today. On Monday night officials in the Justice Department announced they support plaintiffs that include the state of Utah in a court ruling that would undo the health law.

File photo / KUER

Gov. Gary Herbert signed into law a controversial ban on abortions performed after 18 weeks of pregnancy on Monday, joining a handful of red states pushing a host of new abortion restrictions that are likely to be challenged in federal court.

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