LGBTQ | KUER 90.1

LGBTQ

Photo of Carrillon Tower.
Ken Lund, CC via Flickr, http://bit.ly/21dE3M9

Last week, after some back and forth, Brigham Young University doubled down on a campus policy forbidding any romantic behavior between students of the same gender. And the decision has left some LGBT students wondering if they should transfer schools. 

Photo of students holding signs and waving flags outside the church headquarters
Lee Hale / KUER

In mid-February, Brigham Young University administrators quietly removed a section from the school’s honor code titled “homosexual behavior,” and many students celebrated it as a move in the right direction. It seemed that this change would allow gay students to openly date and show affection. 

This episode is packed with goodness from our first ever live show, including:

A pump jack at dusk surrounded by sagebrush
Kate Groetzinger / KUER

Wednesday evening, Mar. 4, 2020

Photo of the dome of the Utah capitol building
Cory Dinter / KUER

Rep. Brad Daw, R-Orem, said he will not run a bill this legislative session banning transgender hormone therapy and surgery for minors. He has opted instead to run legislation to study puberty blocking drugs.

BYU honor code rally photo.
Kelsie Moore/KUER

Wednesday evening, Feb. 19, 2020

Photo of large apartment building under construction in Salt Lake City.
Brian Albers / KUER

Thursday evening, Jan. 30, 2020

Hot show crew faces a fire along a forest road.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE / PUBLIC DOMAIN

Wednesday morning, Jan. 29, 2020

Utah has become the 19th — and most conservative — state in the U.S. to ban "conversion therapy" for minors. The widely discredited practice, aimed at changing a patient's sexual orientation or gender identity, is now formally barred in the state after the new rule took effect late Tuesday.

A spokesperson for Republican Gov. Gary Herbert, who directed licensing regulators to make the change, confirmed the move to NPR on Wednesday.

Photo of the Utah flag with a rainbow sky in the background.
Cory Dinter for KUER

Last week, Utah Governor Gary Herbert and leaders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints came to an agreement on banning conversion therapy for LGBT minors — an effort that stalled with Utah lawmakers earlier this year. 

A raw turkey sits on a counter next to a sink.
iStock

Wednesday evening, November 27, 2019

Photo of Governor Gary Herbert
File / KUER

Updated 12:21 p.m. MST, 11/27/19

LGBTQ+ activists and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints have come together on a proposal to ban conversion therapy for minors. 

Map of U.S. states with laws banning conversion therapy for minors.
Movement Advancement Project

On the heels of Colorado becoming the 18th state to ban “conversion therapy” earlier this year, Utah’s debating the widely discredited practice meant to change an individual’s sexual orientation or gender expression.

The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that the state of Idaho must provide sex reassignment surgery to inmate Adree Edmo.


Illustration of mormon imagery.
Renee Bright / KUER

Mormon culture influences nearly every aspect of life in Utah. But these days many long-held values are being challenged, even by the faithful. KUER’s series “Latter-day” examines how Mormon culture is — and isn’t — changing in response.

Image of person on therapist couch looking distraught
Renee Bright / KUER

The effort to change a young person’s sexual orientation with therapy may soon be prohibited for psychologists in Utah.

Rebecca Ellis / KUER

Members of Utah’s LGBTQ community marched through downtown Salt Lake Sunday for the city's annual Pride Parade. And the corporate sponsors were right behind them.

Photo of flag at city hall.
Erik Neumann / KUER

Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski proclaimed May 28 to June 2 as Pride Week in Salt Lake City on Tuesday. Her announcement kicks off a week of celebrations aimed at the LGBTQ community in the capital and beyond.

BYU valedictorian Matt Easton at the podium.
YouTube/Matt Easton

During his graduation speech Friday, Brigham Young University valedictorian, Matt Easton, told his classmates  “I have come to terms, not with who I thought I should be, but who the Lord has made me to be.”

Renee Bright / KUER

The recent news that The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints would now allow children of LGBTQ people to be blessed and baptised came right on time for the growing family of Kevin Kolditz.

Renee Bright / KUER

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints announced Thursday the rollback of a 2015 policy which restricted baptism of children of gay couples and called them apostates.

Photo of United Methodist Church.
Daysha Eaton / KUER

Religions across America are reckoning with how they address nontraditional members of their faith. The latest is the Methodist Church, which has at least 12 million members in the U.S. and approximately 80 million worldwide.

Photo of Amelia Damarjian
Courtesy Amelia Damarjian

When 19-year-old Amelia Damarjian saw that Utah Gov. Gary Herbert had backed amendments to a proposed conversion therapy ban bill, she was furious.

Photo of Fuentes.
Kelsie Moore / KUER

Note that this story discusses suicide.

Standing alone on stage at the Salt Lake Public Library auditorium, Arturo Fuentes takes a deep breath, and begins to tell his story of torment.

Photo of Troy Williams.
Judy Fahys / KUER

Dozens gathered beneath the Utah Capitol dome Thursday to support new legislation that would outlaw conversion therapy with licensed therapists for those under 18.

Screenshot Twitter.com


An assault against a Salt Lake City man over the weekend for being gay is drawing attention to what’s at stake for hate crime legislation in Utah.

Photo of Stephanie Larsen.
Daysha Eaton / KUER

The Provo-based Encircle, a resource and counseling center for LGBTQ youths and their families, opened a new branch on Thursday in Salt Lake City. Part of the reason they’re expanding is demand — in 2018, they served around 1,000 young people per month and provided counselling to an average of 400 of those they served. And many of their clients had to travel long distances to access services. 

Austen Diamond / KUER

Two competing proposals dealing with the process of changing a person’s sex on legal documents were abandoned by Utah lawmakers on Thursday.

Governor Herbert
screenshot KUED

Gov. Gary Herbert says he generally supports stiffening penalties for hate crimes — that includes protections for LGBTQ individuals — despite a long-stalled effort in the Legislature.

Kelsie Moore / KUER


Utah's Republican dominated Legislature can be a lonely place for a Democrat. That can be especially true for the only openly gay legislator. For six years, that person was Jim Dabakis representing Senate District 2.

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