redistricting | KUER 90.1

redistricting

Photo of San Juan County courthouse.
Ken Lund / Flickr Creative Commons

The San Juan County Commission voted unanimously on Monday to take no further action in a Native American voting rights case that led to the redistricting of the county in 2017. 

US Supreme Court building.
iStock.com / Phillip Nelson

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in a 5-4 decision Thursday that states and federal lawmakers, not courts, are responsible for ending political gerrymandering.

Photo of commissioners.
Judy Fahys / KUER

MONITCELLO — San Juan County reached an historic milestone earlier this month when a Native American majority assumed control of a county’s governing body — a first for Utah.

Julia Ritchey / KUER

The U.S. Department of Justice announced Monday that its sending officials to monitor Tuesday’s election in San Juan County, following similar election poll-watching efforts in 2016.

Photo of finish line.
Nicole Nixon / KUER

Utahns will begin voting on three citizen-led initiatives when ballots start hitting mailboxes soon. This week, we’re bringing you stories of voices behind the initiatives—people who could be directly affected if they pass. ​

A bipartisan group of Colorado lawmakers kicked off an anti-gerrymandering campaign this month. They want to take redistricting decisions out of the hands of state legislators and put it into the hands of twelve voters.

Julia Ritchey, KUER

Gov. Gary Herbert says he thinks a new ballot initiative to reform Utah’s redistricting process is worth considering, but isn’t ready to throw his support behind it.

Julia Ritchey, KUER


A new group is launching a ballot initiative to create an independent commission aimed at reforming the way Utah draws its electoral boundaries.

Utah Legislature Releases Redistricting Documents

Nov 16, 2012

Legislative leaders made 16 thousand pages of documents related to redistricting available online Friday. Earlier this year, leaders in the Utah Democratic Party requested all documents related to 2012 redistricting process. It’s the largest legislative records request in state history and earned them a more than 15 thousand dollar bill the legislature refused to waive. Democrats then refused to pay the bill in full and filed a lawsuit in the third district court over the matter.

A state legislative committee tells the Utah Democratic party that they’ll have to pay to get redistricting documents, representatives from around the world visit Utah to learn from a uranium cleanup site, and the Department of Workforce Services launches a program to help veterans find jobs.

State House and Senate leaders told the Utah Democratic Party yesterday, they will have to pay more than nine thousand dollars if they want to see the remaining redistricting documents they asked for in a GRAMA request. The party had requested a fee waiver based on the argument that release of the records was primarily in the public interest. But the Legislative Records committee rejected the Party’s request for a fee waiver in a 3 to 1 vote. House Democratic leader David Litvack voted against his own party, saying the request primarily benefits the political interests of Democrats.

Andrea Smardon

Two bins of documents related to Utah’s controversial redistricting process remain hidden from the public.  That’s mainly because Utah’s Democratic Party is refusing to pay thousands of dollars to let them go.  The legislature’s Records Committee put off a decision Monday on whether to waive the fee for the records request.  The committee decided it needs more information to determine whether the request primarily serves the public or the Democratic party.