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ski resort

Photo of a ski lift on a snowy mountain
Wikimedia Commons

Ski resorts in Utah that depend on seasonal foreign workers might have problems finding the labor they need this winter season, due to the recent suspension of certain work visas.

Photo of empty chair on a ski lift
Chelsea Naughton / KUER

Restaurants, bars and major ski resorts have begun to temporarily shut down across the Mountain West this week in an effort to curb the spread of COVID-19. But economists said it’s still too early to fully understand the breadth of how these closures will impact the region’s booming tourism economy.

Photo of snow falling on road up Little Cottonwood Canyon.
Chelsea Naughton / KUER

The Utah Transit Authority and the Central Wasatch Commission are continuing the effort to reduce winter congestion in Little and Big Cottonwood Canyons. On Monday, they announced public transportation improvements they say could help get drivers out of their cars and into buses.

Photo of sunset over Salt Lake City.
Brian Albers / KUER

Editor’s Note: During impeachment inquiry hearings, KUER is offering news roundups from around the state and audio of those stories as a resource for our audience.

Photo of a sign listing the distance to Brighton Resort.
Jon Reed / KUER

Utah’s ski season officially began Tuesday as Brighton Resort opened with two lifts and about 12 inches of mostly man-made snow.

Photo of Main Street in Park City, UT.
Pixabay

Setting environmental goals these days isn’t just about projecting an image — for many companies, it’s also good for business.

Don Anderson / Flickr Creative Commons

Western ski towns including Park City are backing a proposal to reform the royalty system for coal mined on federal lands. The reason: Climate change is dragging down their economies, says a coalition called the Mountain Pact.

The group says Park City will lose $120 million dollars in lower output, 1,137 jobs and more than $20 million dollars in paychecks thanks to a shrinking snowpack and less tourism. The Utah ski town has joined ten other mountain communities that want to combat the problem through reforms to federal coal-leasing programs.