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GOP Voters Asked: What Stood Out During Convention Speeches?

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

All right, so we asked some Republican voters what stood out to them during last night's speeches at the convention. When Melania Trump brought up the opioid epidemic...

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

MELANIA TRUMP: If you're struggling with addiction, there is no shame in your illness. Please seek help. You're worth it.

GREENE: ...Kathryn Katori (ph) says she immediately thought of raising her kids in Brooklyn.

KATHRYN KATORI: I used to walk the streets of Bay Ridge to look for my sons at night. The kids in the community, I used to fight for them. Then they started dying. And I belong to the Muslim community. A lot of kids, their fathers and mothers wouldn't go to their funerals because of the stigma of them OD'ing. So when she started talking about the opioid - it hit home, too.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Janelle Leach (ph) lives in Mobile, Ala. She appreciated hearing from Daniel Cameron, the attorney general of Kentucky, who attacked Joe Biden for his past comments about race.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

DANIEL CAMERON: Mr. Vice President, look at me. I am Black. We are not all the same, sir. I am not in chains. My mind is my own.

JANELLE LEACH: The fact that he was an African American is, like, icing on the cake. You know, President Trump and this whole administration has recognized people for who they are and what they're doing and not for identity politics.

GREENE: Tae Kim (ph) of Los Angeles connected with both the first lady and the lieutenant governor of Florida when they spoke of their families escaping communism. Kim's parents were from North Korea.

TAE KIM: My dad was born in Pyongyang. He escaped to the South before the war started. And he used to tell me a lot of stories of how horrible communism is, and it just destroys everything.

GREENE: Three Republican voters there discussing the moments of the convention that spoke to them. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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