Nicole Nixon | KUER 90.1

Nicole Nixon

Reporter

Nicole covers politics and government for KUER and hosts the political podcast 45 Days. She won a regional Edward R. Murrow award for her social media coverage of the 2018 midterm elections and has several first-place awards from the Utah Society of Professional Journalists for stories ranging from Utah’s caucus-convention political nominating system to the state’s complicated liquor laws. Nicole is a Utah native who first joined the KUER Newsroom as an intern in 2013. Besides public radio, she is passionate about beautiful landscapes and breakfast burritos.

Ways to Connect

Photo of billboard that reads "Seraph Young, First Woman To Vote."
Nicole Nixon / KUER

Utah is pulling out all the stops to celebrate the centennial of women’s voting rights and other suffragist anniversaries. Advocates and lawmakers have planned celebrations, lectures and events throughout 2020.

Photo of a ballot that includes the straight party vote option
Renee Bright / KUER

The option to cast a vote for every candidate of your preferred political party on the ballot by checking one box could see its demise in 2020.

Photo of Sen. Mitt Romney at a podium in Senate chambers.
Screenshot NPR Live Stream

Utah Sen. Mitt Romney became the lone Republican to cross party lines in his vote to convict President Donald Trump in his impeachment trial, becoming the only Republican to break from the party. 

Photo of President Donald Trump giving his State of the Union address
NPR live video

Utah’s members of Congress echoed President Donald Trump in celebrating a strong economy but they also praised a handful of bipartisan measures like a new trade deal following the president's State of the Union address Tuesday night.

Aerial view of St. George, Utah.
iStock.com/alpenarts

High-speed trains from Salt Lake to Provo, Ogden and Zion National Park? It could be a reality under a Republican-sponsored bill at the Utah Legislature.

Interior photo of Utah State Capitol building.
KUER File Photo

 


Utah’s legislative session kicked off this week. Over 45 days lawmakers work to pass a budget and wade through more than a thousand bills. KUER’s Caroline Ballard joined political reporters Nicole Nixon and Sonja Hutson to help break it down.

Photo of Utah Gov. Gary Herbert delivering his State of the State address in the state Capitol building.
Sonja Hutson / KUER

Despite being forced to roll back a tax reform plan he had recently signed into law, Gov. Gary Herbert delivered a reflective and hopeful speech at his annual State of the State address Wednesday evening.

Photo of the rotunda of the Utah State Capitol building.
Austen Diamond for KUER

Updated 6:13 p.m. MST, 1/28/2020

Six weeks after passing a contentious tax reform bill in a special session, Utah lawmakers repealed it Tuesday under threat of a referendum. Gov. Gary Herbert signed the repeal Tuesday evening. 

Photo looking down at the House floor where Brad Wilson addresses representatives.
Nicole Nixon

It didn’t take long for House Speaker Brad Wilson to address what he called “the elephant, or to be bipartisan, donkey in the room.” 

Government building - lighted in the morning.
Elaine Clark / KUER

Updated 4:47 p.m. MST 1/23/2020

Confronted by the possibility of a referendum against a tax reform law approved in a December special session, Republican leaders announced Thursday they will repeal the controversial measure.

Photo of Brad Wilson inside the Utah State Capitol building.
Austen Diamond for KUER

Utah’s general legislative session begins next week. That means until mid-March, lawmakers will be debating and voting on bills that could affect Utahns. 

KUER’s political team, Nicole Nixon and Sonja Hutson sat down with House Speaker Brad Wilson to get a preview of this year’s session. 

Rep. Craig Hall on the floor of the Utah House of Representatives.
Cory Dinter for KUER

Information from popular at-home DNA test kits are increasingly being used by police to identify suspects as part of an emerging trend in criminal investigations.

Photo of Erin Mendenhall making the announcement outside.
Nicole Nixon / KUER

On the 11th day of her term as Salt Lake City Mayor, Erin Mendenhall fulfilled a campaign promise by announcing that a city-owned building in Sugar House will house 145 emergency beds for homeless residents.

Nicole Nixon / KUER

Despite a new rule requiring background checks on all gun sales and transfers conducted at facilities owned by Salt Lake County, the first gun show of the year at the county-owned Mountain America Expo Center in Sandy started off without a hitch.

Woman sits at table signing paper.
Nicole Nixon / KUER

Ron Van Otten is camped out in a conference room at the Davis County Library. For several hours a day this month, he’s been greeting people who come to sign a petition against a controversial tax reform measure approved by lawmakers in a December special session.

Photo of Erin Mendenhall getting sworn in as Salt Lake City mayor.
Nicole Nixon / KUER

With a pledge to link arms with businesses, nonprofits and residents to tackle tough issues like affordable housing and air quality, Erin Mendenhall took the reins as mayor of Salt Lake City Monday afternoon.

Photo of cases of beer on store shelves.
Elaine Clark / KUER

From the inland port to ballot initiatives to beer, KUER’s reporters have been following 2019’s biggest stories. Political reporter Nicole Nixon and education reporter Rocio Hernandez joined Caroline Ballard to discuss the issues they’ve been following.

Photo of Gov. Gary Herbert
File photo / KUER

Despite a referendum moving ahead against a large and controversial tax reform bill passed last week, Gov. Gary Herbert announced he signed the measure Thursday morning.

Photo of U.S. Capitol under blue sky.
Nicole Nixon / KUER

WASHINGTON — Articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump will go before the full U.S. House of Representatives next week following approval by the House Judiciary Committee Friday morning.

Photo of capitol facade.
Brian Albers / KUER

The Utah legislature met in a special session last night to pass a massive tax reform bill. KUER's Nicole Nixon has been following the issue and sat down with Bob Nelson to explain what it all means.

woman stands in colorful classroom.
Nicole Nixon / KUER

This week, Republican lawmakers are hoping to hold a special session to pass a large tax reform package. It would impose new sales taxes while cutting the overall income tax rate, and cutting income tax means cutting more than half a billion dollars in education funding. But a plan for replacing that money isn’t in the bill. 

Photo of the Utah state capitol building.
Austen Diamond / KUER

Lawmakers will have an extra $682 million to spend next year, and legislative leaders say that’s a good reason to double a tax cut they’ve proposed as part of a sweeping tax reform bill.

Photo of men dressed as Santa Claus and the Grinch inside Utah's Capitol building.
Nicole Nixon / KUER

In a show of holiday bipartisanship, Santa Claus and the Grinch came together Friday with a message to Utah lawmakers: Don’t hold a special session on tax reform.

Photo inside the Utah State Capitol.
Austen Diamond / KUER

A tax cut for Utahns is a key ingredient to lawmakers’ plan to rewrite the state tax code. But under tax reform plans currently being considered, about one in five Utahns — mostly those without children — would pay more in taxes.

Stock photo of a grocery cart in a supermarket.
iStock

The line for a free Thanksgiving turkey went down the stairs and out the door at the Urban Indian Center in Salt Lake City Wednesday, where the Crossroads Urban Center hosted its annual food giveaway.

Photo of the Wasatch mountains covered in snow.
Brian Albers / KUER

Tuesday morning, November 26, 2019

Austen Diamond for KUER

Friday night, a legislative task force released its third and likely final proposal for restructuring the state’s tax code. It comes ahead of a public hearing scheduled for 5 p.m. Monday.

Photo of the Utah state capitol building.
Brian Albers / KUER

Draft legislation to regulate government use of facial recognition software was unveiled and subsequently abandoned Wednesday after some lawmakers worried it did not do enough to protect privacy.

Building exterior with American flag and sign that says "vote here."
Bob Nelson / KUER

Utahns across the state voted for mayors and city council members in hundreds of municipal elections Nov. 5. In three counties, voters decided on ballot propositions regarding potential changes in county governments.

Here’s a roundup of final results from a few races. The results of some of the races are still pending.

Photo of Salt Lake City attorney Samantha Slark
Trent Nelson / Salt Lake Tribune

Control over some 16,000 acres of undeveloped land in northwest Salt Lake City is in the hands of a Utah judge after he heard oral arguments Monday in a case challenging the Utah Inland Port.

Pages