Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument | KUER 90.1

Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument

Photo of Grand Staircase.
Nate Hegyi / KUER

The Trump administration is responsible for the largest reduction of federally protected land in U.S. history after it shrunk two national monuments in Utah, according to a recent study published in the journal Science.

Photo of U.S. House Natural Resources Committee hearing 3/13/19.
Screenshot U.S. House of Representatives

The power struggle over the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments continued Thursday in Washington, as supporters and opponents told their stories during a hearing about the impact of the Trump administration’s decision to shrink the monuments.

Photo of U.S. Rep. Raul Grijalva
Judy Fahys / KUER News

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The new chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee said he expects Congress to investigate the Trump administration’s decision to shrink the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase Escalante national monuments in southern Utah.

Photo of Mark Austin.
Cory Dinter / KUER

ESCALANTE — The Highway 12 corridor between Escalante and Boulder, a sweeping landscape of wind-carved and uplifted redrock, has been Mark Austin’s entrepreneurial workshop for nearly half a century.

Picture of two people enjoying a vista.
U.S. Bureau of Land Management

U.S. Rep. Chris Stewart, R-Utah, said Thursday that Congress will not pass his bill this year on managing public land in the original Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument.

Photo of Cedar Mesa.
Judy Fahys / KUER

A judge ruled Monday that a federal court in Washington, D.C. — not Salt Lake City — will decide whether it was legal for the Trump administration to shrink two national monuments in southern Utah.

U.S. Department of Interior

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management appears to be backing away from proposals that could call for selling land parcels removed from the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument after agency officials realized the Interior Secretary objects to selling former monument lands.

Howard Berkes / NPR

The Bureau of Land Management has issued draft proposals outlining the uses the federal government wants to allow in the Grand Staircase-Escalante and Bears Ears national monuments in southern Utah.

Courtesy: Colton Hoyt

A Canadian mining company’s recently filed claims to mine in what was once protected public land has triggered new legal questions this week over the Trump administration’s downsizing of the Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument.

 

Environmental groups said Wednesday they might be heading to court to block plans by Vancouver-based Glacier Lake Resources.

 

JUDY FAHYS/KUER News

The latest battle over Utah’s shrunken national monuments has been playing out this week in rural communities. 

Utah’s Republican-controlled Legislature have taken a first step towards renaming hundreds of miles of scenic roads after President Donald Trump.

Judy Fahys/KUER News

Potential energy resources were a big reason behind shrinking two national monuments in Utah, according to a New York Times article on Friday.

Marc Toso / Courtesy: Patagonia

The very public fight between the outdoor gear company, Patagonia, and public lands policymakers continued this week, when the company's founder rejected an offer to testify on Capitol Hill.

Screenshot from House Federal Lands Subcommitee.

Rep. Chris Stewart, R-Utah, presented his bill Thursday to reconfigure what used to be the Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument.

KUER

During his first official trip to Utah, President Donald Trump announced the largest cutback to national monument land in U.S. history. Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante will lose a total of 2 million acres together. While Trump made the announcement in Salt Lake City, KUER's Judy Fahys was in San Juan County talking with Utahns who will be most affected by the change.

Link to original story: http://kuer.org/post/public-lands-emotions-shift-southern-utah-along-national-monument-boundaries

Howard Berkes / NPR

A coalition including conservation groups, outdoor retailer Patagonia and Navajo nonprofit Utah Dine Bikeyah filed a lawsuit against the Trump administration Wednesday over its sharp reductions to the Bears Ears National Monument. It's the fourth lawsuit to be filed since the cuts were announced Monday. 

Julia Ritchey / KUER

Environmental groups and Native American tribes wasted no time in filing lawsuits to stop the Trump administration's vast cuts to two Utah national monuments. 

Judy Fahys/KUER

President Donald Trump’s orders to scale down two national monuments in southern Utah was widely anticipated by residents there.

Julia Ritchey / KUER

To see how far back the issue of public lands has divided Utahns, look no further than the guest list for President Trump’s signing ceremony at the state capitol on Monday.

Julia Ritchey / KUER

Update 12:35 PM MST — Pres. Donald Trump has signed two presidential proclamations, one to modify Bears Ears and another for Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments.

Kelsie Moore / KUER

Thousands of protesters fired up by President Donald Trump's expected announcement to shrink two national monuments in Utah rallied in Salt Lake City on Saturday. Click photo for a gallery by RadioWest's Kelsie Moore.

Source: U.S. Interior Department

Everything about the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument is big. It’s 1.9 million acres. It’s filled with dinosaur bones and ancient history.

Judy Fahys / KUER News

President Donald Trump is expected to cut the size of two national monuments when he comes to Salt Lake City on Monday.

C-Span

Utahns are getting ready for President Donald Trump to visit Salt Lake City. The stopover is expected on Monday.

Judy Fahys/KUER

State lawmakers asked Washington earlier this year to shrink the Grand Staircase Escalante and completely scrap Bears Ears. So, critics of the two national monuments are happy to hear the White House plans to cut the size of both monuments, even if they still don’t know by how much.

Judy Fahys / KUER News

President Donald Trump told Utah leaders Friday he’s going to shrink the boundaries of two national monuments in Utah. Supporters and opponents of the move are already stepping up to make their views known.

Department of Interior

New information emerged over the weekend on the advice Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is giving president Donald Trump on two national monuments in Utah.

KUED

Gov. Gary Herbert covered a range of topics at his monthly press conference on KUED Thursday, including health care, the national monument review and special legislative sessions.

U.S. Department of Interior

U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has submitted what he called a “draft” report after reviewing 27 national monuments over four months. He told the Associated Press Thursday he’s not suggesting eliminating any monuments. But he does want to scale back a few that, in his view, go beyond the limits of the law.

U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke says he’s optimistic about solutions for the state’s national monument controversies after talking with “multitudes” of people during his fourth and final day in Utah.  

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