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U.S. Supreme Court

SCOTUS
KUER File Photo

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday that the Trump Administration’s attempt to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, won’t stand. The program defers deportations of undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children and gives them a legal work permit.

Updated on Wednesday, May 13, at 3:45 p.m. ET

Amid the coronavirus pandemic, the Supreme Court has over two weeks heard oral arguments remotely, with audio streaming live for the public — a first for the court.

The arguments included high-profile cases about religious freedom, President Trump's financial records and the Electoral College.

For each case, both sides had the same amount of time, beginning with two minutes of uninterrupted argument. Then, each justice was allotted two minutes for questioning.

Photo of a voting ballot
Arianna Pickard / KUER

Wednesday evening, Feb. 12, 2020

Last year, on a warm Saturday evening in Boise, Idaho, Timmy Earl Kinner Jr. walked into the birthday party of a family. In a random attack, he stabbed nine people, including the birthday girl Ruya Kadir. That little girl died at just three years old.


SCOTUS
KUER File Photo

A month before the U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments about President Trump ending an Obama-era executive order to protect young immigrants, three Utah higher education higher education institutions have signed on to an amicus brief in support of the program. 

Photo of Amy Wildermuth and Justice Stevens.
Courtesy Amy Wildermuth.

Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens died Tuesday at the age of 99. He was appointed by Gerald Ford, and had spent 35 years on the court before stepping down in 2010. 

US Supreme Court building.
iStock.com / Phillip Nelson

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in a 5-4 decision Thursday that states and federal lawmakers, not courts, are responsible for ending political gerrymandering.

Photo of elk.
iStock.com / DJ_38

The U.S. Supreme Court reaffirmed Native American treaty rights in a narrow ruling Monday in favor of a Crow tribal member who argued he was allowed to hunt out-of-season on traditional lands in Wyoming.

DACA recipient Ciriac Alvarez Valle
Courtesy Ciriac Alvarez Valle

Ciriac Alvarez Valle and Alonso Reyna Rivarola stepped out of the shadows once. They don’t intend to return.

Screenshot of Brett Kavanaugh in testimony.
Associated Press Live Stream

In an unusual weekend session, the U.S. Senate advances to a final vote on the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. 

Brett Kavanaugh at hearings.
Associated Press Live Stream

Senator Susan Collins (R-ME), is speaking on the floor of the US Senate today (approximately 1:00 PM Mountain Time). She's talking about her position on the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. Collins is one of the small group of Senators who could swing the confirmation vote either way. 

Screenshot of Brett Kavanaugh in testimony.
Associated Press Live Stream

The U.S. Senate is holding a cloture vote, Friday, October 5th, to close debate on the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the US Supreme Court. This is not the confirmation vote itself, but it is a key indicator of whether Republicans have the necessary votes to approve Kavanaugh as the replacement for retired Justice Anthony Kennedy.

Watch the proceedings live, beginning at 7:30 a.m. MDT on Friday, 10/5/18.

Image of Jeff Flake in Judiciary Committee.
Reuters Live Feed

Sharlee Mullins Glenn, a founder of the group Mormon Women for Ethical Government, believes it is both a matter of faith and principle that the sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh are taken seriously.

Hatch speaks at Kavanaugh hearing.
Associated Press Live Stream

Updated 5:35 p.m. MDT.

While Utah Sens. Orrin Hatch and Mike Lee said they support an FBI investigation into claims that U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted Christine Blasey Ford in high school, both issued statements Friday afternoon that indicated their impatience with another delay.

Screenshot of Brett Kavanaugh in testimony.
Associated Press Live Stream

The Senate Judiciary Committee is voting on Judge Brett Kavanaugh's Supreme Court nomination. A full Senate vote on the nomination is expected as early next week. Watch the proceeding live.

Image of Sen. Orrin Hatch in judiciary hearing.
Associated Press Live Stream

Sen. Orrin Hatch didn’t believe the woman who accused a Supreme Court nominee of sexual harassment in 1991.

Screenshot of Brett Kavanaugh in testimony.
Associated Press Live Stream

The testimonies from U.S. Supreme Court Nominee Brett Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford have kept people captivated far beyond the Capitol in Washington, D.C. During her testimony, Ford said she is 100 percent sure that this is not a case of mistaken identity, while Kavanaugh said he will not be withdrawing amid these allegations.

Several of Utah’s elected officials were riveted, too, and we’ve rounded up what they’ve been saying on Twitter.

Photo of Anita Hill speaking at University of Utah.
Nicole Nixon / KUER

Anita Hill, who testified before the U.S. Senate 27 years ago about the alleged sexual harassment she faced from a U.S. Supreme Court nominee, does not compare her situation to Christine Blasey Ford’s.

Brett Kavanaugh at hearings.
Associated Press Live Stream

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh and a woman who has accused him of sexually assaulting her in high school, Christine Blasey Ford, are testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Watch the proceeding live.

Screenshot of Anita Hill on C-SPAN
C-SPAN

Anita Hill will give a free lecture at the University of Utah next week on the #MeToo movement amid another high-profile allegation roiling President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee.

Renee Bright / KUER


As President Trump's nominee moves closer to being confirmed to the nation's highest court, Utahns on both sides of the abortion debate are considering what Brett Kavanaugh could mean for Roe v. Wade, the landmark 1973 Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion nationwide.

Brett Kavanaugh at hearings.
Associated Press Live Stream

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is set to face a second round of questions from the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday. He's expected to be questioned about his views on previous Supreme Court cases, as well as a range of policy issues. Kavanaugh is also likely to be questioned about his work on Ken Starr's independent counsel investigation of former President Bill Clinton, and his time working in the White House under former President George W. Bush.

Hatch speaks at Kavanaugh hearing.
Associated Press Live Stream

In a contentious first day of confirmation hearings for President Donald Trump's second U.S. Supreme Court pick, Utah's Republican senators called for a tough but fair process with Sen. Orrin Hatch assuring nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh that he would be confirmed.

Illustration of U.S. Capitol.
Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR

Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh start on Tuesday. Opening statements will take place beginning at 7:30 MDT. Watch video of the hearing live.

Brian Grimmett

Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch continued his campaign against confirming a new U.S. Supreme Court Justice before electing a new president at a speech at the Edward M. Kennedy Institute.

Brian Grimmett

President Barack Obama has nominated Merrick Garland to fill the vacant U.S. Supreme Court seat, but Utah’s Senators insist he shouldn’t even be considered by the Senate.

Gage Skidmore via Creative Commons

Utah Republican Senator Orrin Hatch visited the Utah State Capitol on Tuesday. He told lawmakers and reporters that the U.S. Senate should wait until after the 2016 presidential election to confirm a replacement for the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. 

Thomas Hawk / Flickr Creative Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court cleared the way Monday for Death Row prisoners to continue being executed by lethal injection. It’s a case that’s been watched in Utah, where the use of firing squads is a backup method of execution.

Brian Grimmett/KUER

State lawmakers are considering a bill that would require the Utah Attorney General to appeal directly to the U.S. Supreme Court to settle the longstanding argument over who owns Utah’s public lands.

Brian Grimmett

Lehi Republican Representative Jake Anderegg wants to give public officials the right to refuse to officiate same-sex marriages if they object for religious reasons.

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