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Politics & Government
Election news from across Utah's statewide and national races in 2020.

Republicans Maintain Control of Utah’s 1st, 2nd and 3rd Congressional Districts

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Renee Bright
/
KUER
Many Utahns voted early by mail or drop box this year. And although some ballots are still being counted across Utah, congressional districts 1, 2 and 3 have already been called for their GOP candidates.

Republicans performed well on election night in the races for Utah’s congressional districts. The GOP candidates have won the 1st, 2nd and 3rd congressional districts, according to the Associated Press.

1st Congressional District

Republican Blake Moore will be Utah’s newest member of Congress, representing the state’s 1st Congressional District.

As of 11 p.m. Tuesday, Moore had 68% of the vote. Darren Parry garnered 32%.

The two candidates were vying to replace outgoing Rep. Rob Bishop, R-UT, who has held the seat for nearly 20 years.

Moore thanked his family, friends and supporters for their encouragement. He said it’s been a hard year for everyone.

“But I ran for Congress to be a force for good,” Moore said. “I ran for Congress so my family and my boys can have a strong future rooted in that optimism and that hopefulness that I know is within our country.”

Parry said he had no regrets and was pleased about the civil race between him and Moore.

“One thing about me, I’m a realist, and I realize it’s always going to be an uphill battle in the 1st district as a Democrat,” Parry said. “I’m grateful for the journey and what I’ve learned as a person.”

Moore continues a four-decade stretch of Republicans representing the district.

2nd Congressional District

The Associated Press declared Rep. Chris Stewart, R-UT, the winner in the race for the state’s 2nd Congressional District.

By Tuesday at 11 p.m., Stewart had received 62% of the vote, while Democrat Kael Weston had 34%. Stewart’s vote share is an even larger margin than his re-election in 2018.

Stewart addressed candidates and other Republicans at an election night event hosted by the Utah GOP.

“All of you are like myself where we feel like we’re in a battle for the heart and soul of our country,” Stewart said. “As we fight for religious liberty, as we fight for the sanctity of life, as we fight for freedom versus socialism. These are the issues that bring us together.”

Weston, an author, teacher and former foreign service officer, has said he ran because of Stewart’s support for President Donald Trump.

“Along the 8,000-mile campaign trail, I have met families and people who remain fearful of losing their health insurance or going bankrupt paying medical bills,” Weston said. “I hope Rep. Stewart works to bring our state and country together. We need to remember that there is more we have in common than what separates us.”

Stewart first took office in 2013.

3rd Congressional District

Rep. John Curtis, R-UT, has won a second full term in Congress, according to the Associated Press, handily defeating his democratic challenger Devin Thorpe.

Curtis was first elected in a 2017 special election to fill a vacancy left when former Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-UT, resigned. As of midnight, Curtis had garnered 68.5% of the vote, while Thorpe had 27.4% of the vote.

“It is one of the greatest honors of my life to represent you in Congress,” Curtis wrote to his constituents on Twitter. “I’m very pleased to have the confirmation from voters that we are on the right track.”

Curtis previously served as the mayor of Provo and worked for a shooting range company.

Before running for Congress, Thorpe worked in finance and then transitioned to writing and speaking about poverty, climate change and global health. Thorpe conceded around 8:30 p.m. Tuesday.

“While I am disappointed with the outcome, I am grateful to everyone who supported our campaign in any way,” Thorpe tweeted.

The 3rd Congressional District is reliably Republican — Curtis beat his Democratic challenger in 2018 by 40%.

Updated: November 4, 2020 at 12:37 AM MST
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