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Amid Climate And Fed Pressure, Colorado River Water Managers Attempt To Chart New Course

In 2007, years into a record-breaking drought throughout the southwestern U.S., officials along the Colorado River finally came to an agreement on how they’d deal with future water shortages -- and then quietly hoped that wet weather would return. But it didn’t.

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KUER's Fall Fund Drive Results!

Thanks to everyone who helped us reach our $350,000 goal during this fall fund drive.

NPR Jazz

Salt Lake City, UT – Airs Saturday morning

Wednesday, June 30, 2004 – Doug talks with local book gurus from Ken Sanders Rare Books, King's English Bookstore and Sam Weller's Zion Bookstore about what to read this summer.

Thursday, July 1: TBD – Show TBD

Tuesday, June 29 –

Monday, June 28 – Medicare reform has changed the way we look at the costs of aging. Take a look at what some see as a more humane way to age and die, the hospice.

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RadioWest

Beyond Candidates: 2018 Ballot Measures

Utah voters have a lot of decisions to make this November. From medical marijuana, to Medicaid expansion and a referendum on gerrymandering, it’s a lot to consider.

NPR's Maria Hinojosa in Salt Lake City on October 17

Get your tickets to the live RadioWest at the S.J. Quinney College of Law

Your donation can go twice as far when you give to KUER.

A rundown of the races, candidates and more for Utah’s 2018 midterm elections.

This Week's News In Your Inbox

Get the latest in news, events and station happenings every Thursday with KUER's newsletter.

NPR News

Vicki Christiansen was sworn in this morning as Chief of the U.S. Forest Service. She’s only the second female to serve in this role in its 113-year history.

House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi vowed this week to demand President Trump's tax returns if Democrats win control of the House of Representatives next month.

Pelosi, seeking to regain her gavel as House speaker after elections in November, told The San Francisco Chronicle editorial board that the move "is one of the first things we'd do — that's the easiest thing in the world. That's nothing."

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has a message for Republican voters who are celebrating the confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh: Get to the polls in November if you want more conservatives sitting on judicial benches.

"Lose the Senate, and the project of confirming judges is over for the last two years of President Trump," McConnell said in an interview with NPR in his Capitol Hill office. "That, I think, is a scary prospect to the people who like what we've been doing on the judge project and I hope will help us hold on to our majority."

The remains of Matthew Shepard, whose death became an important symbol in the fight against homophobia — and whose name is on a key U.S. hate-crime law — will be interred at Washington National Cathedral later this month.

Shepard's parents say they're "proud and relieved to have a final resting place for Matthew's ashes."

When Mohammed bin Salman became Saudi Arabia's deputy crown prince in 2015, just before his 30th birthday, it created a wave of optimism that he could modernize a kingdom that has long resisted change.

Change has come rapidly indeed. Women can now drive, the powers of the religious police have been scaled back, and Mohammed has sketched out plans to overhaul and diversify the oil-based economy.

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