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Photo of Michael Bloomberg
Wikimedia Commons

As Utah inches closer to its March 3 presidential primary, Democratic candidate and former New York City mayor Mike Bloomberg is stepping up his already robust campaign in the state. 

A pump jack at dusk surrounded by sagebrush
Kate Groetzinger / KUER

The Bluff Town Council, tasked with overseeing growth in the recently incorporated community, recently faced a quandary.

Photo of a man hiking
Nate Hegyi / Mountain West News Bureau

Southern Utah’s red rock desert is home to towering canyons and the clear, shallow Escalante River. It’s also home to many ancient petroglyphs. Jonathan Paklaian is trying to find one along the banks of the river. He scrambles along a cliff wall until he spots it — a petroglyph he says was drawn more than 800 years ago by the Indigenous Fremont people. 

Photo of Mitt Romney
Pool Photo

Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, made history this week by voting to convict President Donald Trump, a member of his own party, on one of two articles of impeachment. He was the only member of the Republican party to vote to convict the president — and that decision is making waves throughout the state.

Photo of billboard that reads "Seraph Young, First Woman To Vote."
Nicole Nixon / KUER

Utah is pulling out all the stops to celebrate the centennial of women’s voting rights and other suffragist anniversaries. Advocates and lawmakers have planned celebrations, lectures and events throughout 2020.

Photo of Orem from above
iStock

It’s no secret Utah is booming, and Utah County is expected to grow more than any other. By 2065, it’s projected to add more than one million people, accounting for 37% of the state’s population growth.

Photo of a ballot that includes the straight party vote option
Renee Bright / KUER

The option to cast a vote for every candidate of your preferred political party on the ballot by checking one box could see its demise in 2020.

Photo of three men is suits sitting in armchairs, with a group of microphones in the middle.
Sonja Hutson / KUER

Updated 1:39 p.m. MST 2/6/2020

Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, met with Republican leadership in the Utah House and Senate Thursday to explain his vote to convict President Donald Trump on the first of two articles of impeachment.

Photo of Bears Ears Buttes.
KUER File Photo

Updated 2:24 p.m. MST 2/6/2020

In the face of ongoing litigation from tribes and conservation groups, the Trump administration has finalized plans to expand drilling, mining and grazing across southern Utah — including within the former bounds of Grand Staircase-Escalante and Bears Ears National Monuments. 

The city of St. George is shown from above. The white temple stands above the tree-lined streets.
Kelsie Moore / RadioWest Films

ST. GEORGE — The new, tongue-in-cheek aesthetic for this fast-growing city in 2020 is “pioneer chic.”

Photo of the drilling rig.
Bureau of Land Management

President Donald Trump somewhat misrepresented his administration’s role in the expansion of domestic oil and gas production during his State of the Union address Tuesday. 

Photo of Sen. Mitt Romney at a podium in Senate chambers.
Screenshot NPR Live Stream

Utah Sen. Mitt Romney became the lone Republican to cross party lines in his vote to convict President Donald Trump in his impeachment trial, becoming the only Republican to break from the party. 

Picture of a female lawmaker introducing a bill.
Rocio Hernandez

Assistant Minority Whip and State Sen. Jani Iwamoto, D-Holladay, introduced S.B. 80, a bill that seeks to study law enforcement departments at Utah public colleges and universities. A final report would be presented to the Education and Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice interim committees. 

Photo of President Donald Trump giving his State of the Union address
NPR live video

Utah’s members of Congress echoed President Donald Trump in celebrating a strong economy but they also praised a handful of bipartisan measures like a new trade deal following the president's State of the Union address Tuesday night.

Photo of Jacob Anderegg presenting a bill to a Utah Senate committee
Sonja Hutson / KUER

A $35 million affordable housing bill passed a state Senate committee Tuesday, with two Democrats voting for it and one Republican voting against it. 

Photo of people wearing surgical masks in a crowd.
Powerofflowers / iStock.com

The coronavirus that originated in Wuhan, China, now has more than 20,000 reported cases. Flights to China have been canceled, quarantines are in place and the outbreak has been declared a public health emergency by the World Health Organization.

Congressman Ben McAdams
Kelsie Moore / KUER

The race for Utah’s 4th Congressional District, currently represented by the state’s lone Democrat, remains deeply lopsided when it comes to campaign donations, according to the latest filings with the Federal Elections Commission. 

Aerial view of St. George, Utah.
iStock.com/alpenarts

High-speed trains from Salt Lake to Provo, Ogden and Zion National Park? It could be a reality under a Republican-sponsored bill at the Utah Legislature.

Young woman in blue blazer sitting at round brown table in front of a brown bookcase.
Sonja Hutson / KUER

 

In her first year as Utah’s youngest lawmaker, 27-year-old Rep. Candice Pierucci, R-Herriman, often gets mistaken for an intern by security officers at the State Capitol.

A smattering of trees sits in the foreground beneath a large arch on a canyon rim.
David Fuchs / KUER

There’s long been a divide at the state Legislature between southern Utah and the more populous Wasatch Front. And booming growth in southwest Utah is leaving behind the rural southeast and central parts of the state, some lawmakers say. 

Photo of Curt Bramble and Mary Taylor presenting the bill.
Sonja Hutson / KUER

A bill requiring that medical providers bury or cremate an aborted or miscarried fetus passed a Utah Senate committee Friday. 

Photo of a cow grazing.
Courtesy of the Bureau of Land Management

New legislation introduced in the U.S. House Thursday would make it easier for conservation groups to remove cattle and sheep from federal lands. 

Photo of the gubernatorial candidates on stage for their first debate.
Sonja Hutson / KUER

Six Republican candidates for Utah governor sparred in a debate Friday at the Silicon Slopes Tech Summit. It largely focused on how best to manage the state’s growth and highlighted the conversation about political insiders and outsiders. 

Photo of Main Street in Park City, UT during Sundance.
Jon Reed / KUER

The Sundance Film Festival brings in tens of thousands of people to the streets of Park City. And for many of the area’s small businesses, it’s one of the biggest weeks of the year. 

Interior photo of Utah State Capitol building.
KUER File Photo

 


Utah’s legislative session kicked off this week. Over 45 days lawmakers work to pass a budget and wade through more than a thousand bills. KUER’s Caroline Ballard joined political reporters Nicole Nixon and Sonja Hutson to help break it down.

Photo of the Utah Senate gallery.
Lee Hale / KUER

In a move to prepare Utah’s water system for more explosive population grown, a bill to create a market system for temporarily buying and selling water rights is moving through the Utah State Senate. 

Law enforcement stand in front of a home
Courtesy of ACLU of Utah

The American Civil Liberties Union of Utah has filed a lawsuit against agents from Utah Adult Probation and Parole and it’s director over an August 2018 raid on a Salt Lake City home. 

Sundance After #MeToo

Jan 30, 2020
Photo of Drew Dixon sitting on a couch in front of windows.
Courtesy of "On the Record" film team

The legacies of the Sundance Film Festival and Harvey Weinstein are deeply entwined. Weinstein made some of his greatest finds at the festival — films such as “Reservoir Dogs” and “Sex, Lies, and Videotape” — which not only helped establish the festival’s reputation as a top market for independent talent but his own as one of the most powerful producers in Hollywood. 

Picture of a woman sitting inside a church
Kelsie Moore / RadioWest Films

Two years ago, Vicky Chavez was facing deportation and almost got on a plane headed to her native Honduras, the country she had escaped to get away from a violent relationship. She came to Utah in 2014 as an undocumented immigrant to join the rest of her family who was already living here.

Photo of Utah Gov. Gary Herbert delivering his State of the State address in the state Capitol building.
Sonja Hutson / KUER

Despite being forced to roll back a tax reform plan he had recently signed into law, Gov. Gary Herbert delivered a reflective and hopeful speech at his annual State of the State address Wednesday evening.

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